Bipolar and Mental Illnesses are written about here. Written by a bipolar person themselves.

Area of brain linked to bipolar disorder pinpointed


I have wondered for years what part of the brain can make you bipolar, or at least, what part of the brain is consistent with those who have bipolar? Being bipolar, I have always questioned what happened to my brain when I became diagnosed bipolar? Well I know now, trauma. Lots and lots of trauma. When I was in my 20’s, and being first diagnosed, I thought I was going crazy. I didn’t understand what was happening to my brain. It felt like it was changing, literally. It gave me headaches and worse. Well, yesterday a new article came out claiming that they pin pointed where in the brain is linked to bipolar. I have shown parts of the article, but to read the whole thing, go to the source at the bottom of the page. 


Summary: “A volume decrease in specific parts of the brain’s hippocampus — long identified as a hub of mood and memory processing — was linked to bipolar disorder in a new study.

“A volume decrease in specific parts of the brain’s hippocampus — long identified as a hub of mood and memory processing — was linked to bipolar disorder in a study led by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).”


“Our study is one of the first to locate possible damage of bipolar disorder in specific subfields within the hippocampus,” said Bo Cao, Ph.D., first and corresponding author and a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at McGovern Medical School at UTHealth. “This is something that researchers have been trying to answer. The theory was that different subfields of the hippocampus may have different functions and may be affected differently in different mood disorders, such as bipolar disorder and major depression disorder.”

“The research team used a combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and a state-of-the-art segmentation approach to discover differences in the volumes of subfields of the hippocampus, a seahorse-shaped region in the brain. Subjects with bipolar disorder were compared to healthy subjects and subjects with major depressive disorder.”


“Researchers found that subjects with bipolar disorder had reduced volumes in subfield 4 of the cornu ammonis (CA), two cellular layers and the tail portion of hippocampus. The reduction was more severe in patients with bipolar I disorder than other mood disorders investigated.”

“Further, in patients with bipolar I disorder, the volumes of certain areas such as the right CA 1 decreased as the illness duration increased. Volumes of other CA areas and hippocampal tail were more reduced in subjects who had more manic episodes.”

  • The picture below shows hippocampal subfield measurements. 


Source: Sciencedaily.com

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