Bipolar and Mental Illnesses are written about here.

Archive for the ‘brain’ Category

Status

Noopept and its Benefits 

Noopept and its Benefits

“Noopept is the brand name for N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester, a Nootropic molecule similar to Piracetam. Noopept may alleviate cognitive decline.”

“Noopept is the brand name for N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester , a synthetic nootropic molecule.”

“Noopept has a similar effect to piracetam, in that it provides a mild cognitive boost after supplementation. Noopept also provides a subtle psychostimulatory effect.”

The other week, my husband bought the Noopept you see above, and told me that I should start taking it to help with my memory. He told me how it can help reverse memory loss and help with cognition. So far, I’ve been taking it for about 10 days and I can already sense that something has happened, or is happening to my memory. I have been able to recall certain memories with a much clearer view, so to say. It’s very hard to explain. I feel like I can reach certain memories in my head, but not all of them like the way I can, now that I’ve been using Noopept. I certainly recommend it for anyone at any age. Don’t wait till it’s too late to reverse damage. Help your brain today. 

“Noopept is one of the strongest nootropics available on the market today. It provides a boost to overall cognition and has a slight psychostimulatory effect. Contrary to most nootropics, Noopept’s effects start within mere minutes of ingestion making it an excellent choice right before mentally demanding tasks.”

“Noopept is a nootropic supplement that’s been getting a lot of attention lately. It has close ties to the popular racetam family of nootropics that are known for their benefits on cognitive ability as well their neuroprotective properties. What makes Noopept a unique nootropic in your toolbox is that its effects are felt almost immediately after ingestion.”

“Many nootropics can take days, weeks, or even months, for their full effects to kick in but Noopept is another story. Another nootropic that compares to Noopept’s immediate effects is phenylpiracetam.”

“Currently, Noopept is being prescribed and distributed in Russia and its surrounding countries for its nootropic properties. Its popularity has drastically increased and is now distributed worldwide.”

“Noopept as a nootropic is commonly compared to piracetam and aniracetam. It works via a similar mechanism as piracetam but is estimated to be 1,000 to 5,000 times more potent. This doesn’t imply that its effect is more profound, it just attunes itself better to the brain’s receptors. As a result, Noopept can be taken in relatively smaller doses to produce similar effects as that of Piracetam.”

What are benefits of taking Noopept? 

•Memory and Learning

“Noopept’s most emphasized benefit is how it can enhance memory and improve the learning process. Noopept, like Piracetam, assists with memory formation, but with additional benefits not present in the latter, which are memory consolidation and memory retrieval. Noopept facilitates the proper management of all forms of stimuli as they are processed by the brain, which allows for better memory retrieval. In other words, signals being processed by our senses are more streamlined as they are transported into our brains in the form of memory.”

“Through the continued use of Noopept, you will notice that you can digest more information and process it more readily for use in your daily activities. You might even recall names, places, maybe a word spoken in a chance encounter, a song title that you thought you had forgotten before, and so on. Memory lapses will be a thing of the past, or at least kept to a minimum.”


•Neuroprotective Properties

“Studies show that Noopept has high neuroprotective properties. The stimulation of the neurons caused by the health supplement prevents oxidative damage and apoptosis in the human brain. Many patients dealing with cognitive impairment regularly can benefit from a regular dosage of Noopept to prevent further dissociative cognitive functions.”


•Increased levels of NGF

“NGF (Nerve Growth Factor) is a unique protein in the body that is involved in the growth, maintenance, and survival of nerve cells, including brain cells. NGF is also considered to be a key player in neurogenesis, your body’s ability to create new cells.”


“By increasing NGF levels in the brain, we support the mechanisms involved in neurogenesis which improves the performance of neural networks within the brain, allowing for new neural connections. The result means potentially improved mental abilities in virtually all areas of cognition.”




•Increased levels of BDNF

“BDNF (Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor) is another protein in the body that has a similar role to the NGF mentioned above. BDNF is considered one of the most important molecules involved in memory, playing a vital role in both short-term and long-term memory formation.”

•Improves Associations between Brain Hemispheres

“Both the right and left hemispheres of the brain have their own localized functions. Through the use of Noopept, each of these functions can be enhanced through the synthesis of various memories, ideas, and stimuli. There are nuances among these functions that enhance the way we think. That is why a lot of people have claimed that their quality of life had a significant improvement when taking Noopept in regular doses.”

If you want to read more about how Noopept works, its dosaging, and stacking; read the whole article. 

Source: braintropic.com

Source: Noopept

Status

16 Ways Exercise Makes You a Happier Person

Status

Area of brain linked to bipolar disorder pinpointed

Area of brain linked to bipolar disorder pinpointed


I have wondered for years what part of the brain can make you bipolar, or at least, what part of the brain is consistent with those who have bipolar? Being bipolar, I have always questioned what happened to my brain when I became diagnosed bipolar? Well I know now, trauma. Lots and lots of trauma. When I was in my 20’s, and being first diagnosed, I thought I was going crazy. I didn’t understand what was happening to my brain. It felt like it was changing, literally. It gave me headaches and worse. Well, yesterday a new article came out claiming that they pin pointed where in the brain is linked to bipolar. I have shown parts of the article, but to read the whole thing, go to the source at the bottom of the page. 


Summary: “A volume decrease in specific parts of the brain’s hippocampus — long identified as a hub of mood and memory processing — was linked to bipolar disorder in a new study.

“A volume decrease in specific parts of the brain’s hippocampus — long identified as a hub of mood and memory processing — was linked to bipolar disorder in a study led by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).”


“Our study is one of the first to locate possible damage of bipolar disorder in specific subfields within the hippocampus,” said Bo Cao, Ph.D., first and corresponding author and a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at McGovern Medical School at UTHealth. “This is something that researchers have been trying to answer. The theory was that different subfields of the hippocampus may have different functions and may be affected differently in different mood disorders, such as bipolar disorder and major depression disorder.”

“The research team used a combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and a state-of-the-art segmentation approach to discover differences in the volumes of subfields of the hippocampus, a seahorse-shaped region in the brain. Subjects with bipolar disorder were compared to healthy subjects and subjects with major depressive disorder.”


“Researchers found that subjects with bipolar disorder had reduced volumes in subfield 4 of the cornu ammonis (CA), two cellular layers and the tail portion of hippocampus. The reduction was more severe in patients with bipolar I disorder than other mood disorders investigated.”

“Further, in patients with bipolar I disorder, the volumes of certain areas such as the right CA 1 decreased as the illness duration increased. Volumes of other CA areas and hippocampal tail were more reduced in subjects who had more manic episodes.”

  • The picture below shows hippocampal subfield measurements. 


Source: Sciencedaily.com

Status

Food for Depression

Food for Depression 



It is January, and now officially winter everywhere. Since I live in Florida, our cold is just arriving for its short while. During the winter months people are much more likely to become depressed. People can become depressed from the cold weather, the cloudy skies, staying warm with layers of clothes, your monotonous job. There are endless reasons why someone could get down and feel a little depressed. The good news is, there are so many ways to fight depression with food, eating the right kind. Here are two examples of foods to eat to feel less sad and lessen depression. 


If you are in need of a pick-me-up, or a mood booster, here are foods for a brighter mood. Boosting your mood can elavate you to another level. They can turn that frown upside down… if you let them. 


What is it in our bodies that keep us happy? Do you know? This chart shows what you need to eat to keep a happy brain. 


In our brains we have 4 chemicals that keep us regulated and happy. Without them, even having one low can cause you to feel fatigue and create anxiety, up to depression. So learn these four chemicals and feed your brain. 





Along side depression is stress and anxiety. There are so many foods that can help you ease your stress, and lessen anxiety. I have struggled with anxiety for over a decade now, and I have come to learn that I act nicer and feel happier when I have these foods in my body. 



So stay healthy and happy this winter season. Eat the right foods, supplements and vitamins, whatever it calls for to keep a happy brain, and help stay away from depression. Along with alleviating depression. 

Status

Do you know what a Manic Episode is?


What is a Manic Episode? Do you know? Can you spot one? Do you know the  symptoms?


Manic Episodes are horrible experiences that people with Bipolar Disorder must live with. It’s the other side of depression that very few people get to see, so sometimes, trying to spot a manic episode is pretty easy and clear what to look for. Whenever I have a manic episode I feel as if I am riding a roller coaster with emotions and millions of thoughts all getting jumbled up in my head. Now I must say, I have come a very far way, and my manic episodes have been been getting further and further apart. 

But first I must tell you about the bad manic episodes that I had so that you can learn about them more, and recognize that it is preventable. I wish my family read up about my own condition more, because to this day, after being diagnosed for close to a decade now, they still don’t see when they are triggering my emotions and I’m showing tell tale signs that I’m about to break out into a manic episode. 

This is where things can get scary. Bipolar is a disorder where your faults are contained with curse words, put-downs, threats and maybe even physical violence. First there is screaming, for no reason. Your brain and head hurt from all the thoughts you have racing inside. Others will get rage and throw things, all because it feels good to do wrong. How wrong is that? That is why I hate Bipolar Disorder. It makes sweet, innocent people into monsters, and no one wants to stick around to see the end. I remember one night, it was so bad that I screamed how badly I wanted to break something, throw something, anything to make something break. Well I did, not thinking, I took off my most-expensive watch and threw it as hard as I could against the wall. It obviously broke. But the rage inside me told me to throw anything. 


It is incredibly hard to stop someone once they are having a manic episode. Luckily, there are so many signs to catching the breakout, and all you have to do is ask, “Are you ok?” Their answer will say it all. Whether they say they’re alright or not, you can hear it on the person’s voice if something is wrong. Next, check to see if the person is speaking very fast, or incoherently. This is a direct sign that you must help the person to sit down and breathe before things escalate to a true episode. 


AWARENESS IS KEY!!! 

The statistics say 5.5 Million people age 18+, live with Bipolar Disorder. It only affects 2.6% of the population. And there are approximately 51% that go untreated every year. I cannot imagine for one minute being without my medication. I do not know where I would be, or who I would be. 

Status

How Antidepressants Hurt  Bipolar Disorder Sufferers

Getting rid of antidepressants, for those who suffer from Bipolar Disorder, can be scary at first, but continuing on these rapid-cycling enducing drugs harm you further and can cause your manic episodes to be more frequent and so much more intense. Stopping taking these antidepressants if you’re Bipolar and having rapid cycling. The rapid cycling will disappear slowly, everything takes time. Especially getting all of the medication out of your body. This took me weeks to recognize the difference, and within months I felt a million times better! 


“Discontinuing rather than maintaining antidepressant medications following treatment of depression in patients with rapid-cycling bipolar disorder (BD) appears to improve outcomes, new research shows.”


“Long-term continuation of antidepressants was associated with more mood episodes in patients with rapid-cycling bipolar disorder.”

“Any history of rapid cycling or antidepressant-induced mania is a very good predictor of doing poorly with long-term antidepressant treatment.”


When I was going to a Bipolar Specialist to receive my medications, (this is almost 10 years ago now) I was given antidepressants, but they made my head hurt, made my brain hurt, and gave me the worst rapid cycling in my life! In fact one day it was so bad, I had to go to the hospital due to my manic episodes I was having every 30 minutes! Can you even try to imagine your body having these incredible highs that make you want to scream from all the thoughts that are rushing through your head? It was my own misery. After that, I never saw that whack doctor again and I found myself the best doctor I have ever known to this day, when it comes to dealing with all these issues. I say that he saved me. 


“Antidepressants are the most commonly prescribed class of medication in BD. If they cause or worsen rapid cycling…this represents a major public health problem. Safely and effectively treating rather than exacerbating mood episodes in the most severely ill among this patient population is a priority.”


“Many clinicians have noted that depression is more common in patients on antidepressants. A randomized discontinuation study in a sample that appears to have benefited from an antidepressant was the best way to test the hypothesis.”


I feel that so many people are suffering with their bipolar meds, and I know half of them need to quit taking their antidepressants, and try something specifically designed for bipolar, like Abilify. That is what I take now. I am on a very low dosage because my bipolar is so well managed. I want awareness passed on. I want to help those suffering. Please make an open dialogue about this. You’ll be surprised how open people will be with you if you give them a chance. You’ll also find the amount of people suffering with a mental illness is much more than what you believe. The person you work next to might be bipolar. So let’s all be a little more sensitive and spread awareness!


“Among patients with rapid-cycling BD and those with non-rapid-cycling BD who had discontinued antidepressants, the patients with rapid-cycling BD who continued antidepressants had 268% more total mood episodes per year, 293% more depressive episodes per year, and 28.8% less time in remission compared with the patients with non-rapid-cycling BD who continued antidepressants.”


“Paradoxical as it sounds, antidepressants worsen depression in bipolar illness,” Dr Ghaemi told Medscape Medical News. “This isn’t paradoxical when we realize that bipolar illness is an illness of recurrent mood episodes, mostly depressive, and antidepressants make more and more mood episodes happen, which means that they cause more depressive episodes.”

Status

Biggest Bipolar Triggers – No. 1

Biggest Bipolar Triggers


The Hardest:

“Avoiding Top Bipolar Triggers”

“Bipolar disorder is characterized by extreme shifts in mood — from high moments of grandeur to deeply depressed lows.”

“And when those shifts are severe enough, they can have a profound effect on your life.”It may take months or years to piece your life back together after the damage is done”, says psychiatrist Jeffrey Bennett, MD, an assistant professor of psychiatry at the Southern Illinois University School of Medicine in Springfield.”

“But can they be avoided? Perhaps. Understanding what triggers mood swings and planning ahead to deal with them can help you avoid a damaging episode of mania or depression.”


“One of the most common bipolar triggers is stress. In a study published in June 2014 in the Journal of Affective Disorders, negative or stressful life events seemed to trigger mood swings. “People with bipolar disorder are seven to eight times more likely to experience an unwanted, extended period of extreme mood shift — failure of their ususal coping mechanisms — in response to a stressful life event,” says Dr. Bennett. The events that cause serious stress are highly individual, but certain key life events and lifestyle patterns may act as triggers.”

everydayhealth.com

Status

Psychotic Experiences Linked to Cognitive Changes


Psychotic Experiences Linked to Cognitive Changes

From: Psychcentral.com



“Recent research suggests that people who have psychotic experiences, but no diagnosis of psychotic illness, have altered cognitive functioning compared with people without psychotic experiences.”

“A substantial minority of the general population, around six percent, experiences subclinical psychotic experiences, report MSc student Josephine Mollon of King’s College London, UK, and colleagues in the journal JAMA Psychiatry.”

“Both disorders share risk factors such as low IQ, childhood maltreatment, and stressful life events, as well as similar brain scan results such as deficits in grey and white matter.”

“The researchers looked at neuropsychological functioning and psychotic experiences in adults, taking into account sociodemographic characteristics and age. They used information gathered from household surveys covering 1,677 people aged 16 years or older, living in two areas of London, UK. Average age was 40 years.”
“Participants’ psychotic experiences were measured using the Psychosis Screening Questionnaire, which is administered by an interviewer. It assesses psychotic experiences in the previous year, covering thought disorder, paranoia, strange experiences, and hallucinations. The tool also covers hypomania, a mild form of mania, marked by elation and hyperactivity, but this was not assessed as the focus was on psychosis.”

“Cognitive functioning was measured with a series of tests looking at verbal knowledge (using a reading test), working memory, general memory, and cognitive processing speed. From this, an overall IQ score was calculated.”
“One in ten of the participants had previously had psychotic experiences. This group was not significantly different from those without psychotic experiences on overall IQ or processing speed. But they scored less highly on verbal knowledge, working memory, and general memory.”

“Medium to large impairments in cognitive functioning were seen among participants aged 50 years and older with psychotic experiences. These differences remained once socioeconomic status, cannabis use, and common mental disorders were taken into account.”

“The team writes, “The profile of cognitive impairment in adults with psychotic experiences differed from that seen in adults with psychotic disorders, suggesting important differences between subclinical and clinical psychosis.””

Status

Bipolar and Memory Loss

  

Read the whole article at: Bipolar and Memory Loss

“People with bipolar disorder often report problems with memory and cognition. They have trouble with short- and long-term memory, think things through at subdued speeds, and have difficulty thinking outside that so-called box.”

  
“These memory problems can pose considerable challenges for bipolar patients. One recent study presented the case of a 48-year-old computer programmer who had severe memory problems as one of his bipolar symptoms. His job was at stake because he had difficulty mentally accessing information memorized prior to the onset of his bipolar disorder. He told doctors that he was sure he knew the information, but couldn’t figure out how to get to it. He would eventually remember the information, but it could take hours before it would come to him.”

  
Memory Loss and Bipolar Disorder

“Memory problems in bipolar disorder typically have been considered a side effect of the manic highs and depressive lows of the condition:”

  • Mania. Some studies have shown that memory and cognition problems are at their worst during manic episodes. Patients operating at high speeds due to mania have a hard time encoding new information into their memories and also show difficulty accessing memories.
  • Depression. Other research has revealed that depressive phases also can create problems with memory. “When your mind is preoccupied with negative thoughts about yourself, your world, your future, you aren’t as able to concentrate and [be] in the moment,” says Michael Thase, MD, professor of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center in Philadelphia. “If your mind is occupied at one level, there’s less capacity to pay attention and encode and store information.””

  
“More recent research has found that bipolar patients who are between mood swings also have memory problems and other cognitive deficits. That has lead some doctors to question whether mood swings are the real reason patients endure memory loss issues. Other possible explanations include:”

  
“Differences in brain chemistry and function related to bipolar disorder. “It may be that depression causes memory troubles both in a mental way — by occupying your mind — and also in a neurobiological way by inhibiting the connectivity between nerve cells,” Dr. Thase says.”

  
“Side effects of medications prescribed for bipolar symptoms. “You also can have memory problems with several of the more commonly prescribed medications, lithium being the most notorious,” Thase says.”

Status

High & Low Levels of Cortisol are Bad for Bipolar Disorder – Part 2

Now that you know all about cortisol and how it’s the “stress hormone”, learn why older bipolar patients are affected more when their levels of cortisol are off. It leads to depression and a whole lot more. Please share this information with friends, family, co-workers and most importantly, those who have mental illnesses like bipolar disorder. 

Learn more at:

www.anxiety.org
“The increased risks of those with bipolar disorder”: 

  

Elevated or low levels of the stress hormone cortisol are associated with depression and lower quality of life in bipolar patients, a new study from Umeå University in Sweden announced. The study found that depression is almost twice as common and poor quality of life is five times as common in people with bipolar disorder.”

  

“Bipolar disorder affects approximately 5.7 million adults in the US every year. People with bipolar disorder experience unusual shifts in mood, energy, activity levels, and ability to carry out day-to-day tasks. Previous studies confirmed that stress triggers bipolar episodes in patients. Mania and depression further contribute to the stress load experienced by people with bipolar disorder. The relationship between the stress system, depression, and quality of life, however, had not been examined until this study.”

  

““In bipolar depression the stress system is often activated, which means that the affected individuals have elevated cortisol levels in the blood. We have now been able to show that both over- and underactivity in the stress system, with corresponding elevated or reduced cortisol levels, can impair mental health in terms of depression and poor quality of life in these patients,” said Umeå University PhD student Martin Maripuu.”
  

  • The Research

“The study examined the cortisol levels in 145 type one and two bipolar patients and matched them with 145 controls. Researchers used the Dexamethasone Suppression Test (DST) to measure cortisol levels in patients, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS-S) to measure self-reported depression, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment–100 and the Global Assessment of Functioning to measure self-reported quality of life.”

  

“Depression was twice as common in bipolar patients with high and low cortisol levels, as compared to people with normal cortisol levels in their blood. Low quality of life was six times more common in patients with bipolar and low cortisol levels. It was five times more common in patients with bipolar and high cortisol levels. Additionally, patients with low cortisol have, on average, had their disorder for a longer period of time. This could mean that people with bipolar disorder experience chronic stress, which causes an “exhaustion” of the stress system, resulting in reduced cortisol levels.”

  

  • What it Means

“Though these new breakthroughs need additional research, this information could lead to a better understanding and better treatment of bipolar disorder. These researchers have shifted the focus of bipolar disorder treatment by suggesting that effective treatment of bipolar disorder should involve regulating and researching the stress system.”

Status

High & Low Levels of Cortisol are Bad for Bipolar Disorder – Part 1

  
When I began reading about cortisol, “the Stress Hormone”, I became concerned when reading that bipolar patients had poorer health with high and low levels. Normal levels of cortisol did not affect most other bipolar patients. 

  

The following is from psychologytoday.com – 

Cortisol: Public Enemy #1
“The stress hormone, cortisol, is public health enemy number one. Scientists have known for years that elevated cortisol levels: interfere with learning and memory, lower immune function and bone density, increase weight gain, blood pressure, cholesterol, heart disease… The list goes on and on.”

  

“Chronic stress and elevated cortisol levels also increase risk for depression, mental illness, and lower life expectancy.”

“Cortisol is released in response to fear or stress by the adrenal glands as part of the fight-or-flight mechanism. The fight-or-flight mechanism is part of the general adaptation syndrome defined in 1936 by Canadian biochemist Hans Selye of McGill University in Montreal. He pubished his revolutionary findings in a simple seventy-four line article in Nature, in which he defined two types of “stress”: eustress (good stress) and distress (bad stress).”

  

“Both eustress and distress release cortisol as part of the general adaption syndrome. Once the alarm to release cortisol has sounded, your body becomes mobilized and ready for action—but there has to be a physical release of fight or flight. Otherwise, cortisol levels build up in the blood which wreaks havoc on your mind and body.”

  
Eustress creates a “seize-the-day” heightened state of arousal, which is invigorating and often linked with a tangible goal. Cortisol returns to normal upon completion of the task. Distress, or free floating anxiety, doesn’t provide an outlet for the cortisol and causes the fight-or-flight mechanism to backfire.”

 

 
 

 

Status

All About Your 7 Chakras

  

  • What is a Chakra?

“The Sanskrit word Chakra literally translates to wheel or disk. In yoga, meditation, and Ayurveda, this term refers to wheels of energy throughout the body. There are seven main chakras, which align the spine, starting from the base of the spine through to the crown of the head. To visualize a chakra in the body, imagine a swirling wheel of energy where matter and consciousness meet.  This invisible energy, called Prana, is vital life force, which keeps us vibrant, healthy, and alive.”

– See more at: 

Chakras

   
  

 

    

  • The Importance of the Main Chakras in the Body

These swirling wheels of energy correspond to massive nerve centers in the body. Each of the seven main chakras contains bundles of nerves and major organs as well as our psychological, emotional, and spiritual states of being. Since everything is moving, it’s essential that our seven main chakras stay open, aligned, and fluid. If there is a blockage, energy cannot flow. Think of something as simple as your bathtub drain. If you allow too much hair to go into the drain, the bathtub will back up with water, stagnate and eventually bacteria and mold will grow. So is too with our bodies and the chakras. A bathtub is simple; it’s physical so the fix is easy.”
  

“Keeping a chakra open is a bit more of a challenge, but not so difficult when you have awareness. Since mind, body, soul, and spirit are intimately connected, awareness of an imbalance in one area will help bring the others back into balance. Take for example, a wife, who has recently lost her husband. She develops acute bronchitis, which remains in the chest, and then gets chest pains each time she coughs. The whole heart chakra is affected in this case. If she realizes the connection between the loss and the bronchitis, healing will occur much faster if she honors the grieving process and treats that as well as the physical ailment.”
  
Read the whole article to learn more:

What is a Chakra


  • The seven chakras are the centers in our bodies in which energy flows through.

Blocked energy in our seven chakras can often lead to illness, so it’s important to understand what each chakra represents and what we can do to keep this energy flowing freely. Here’s our quick summary:



1. Root Chakra — Represents our foundation and feeling of being grounded

  • Location: Base of spine in tailbone area.
  • Emotional issues: Survival issues such as financial independence, money and food.

  

   
 

2. Sacral Chakra — Our connection and ability to accept others and new experiences.

  • Location: Lower abdomen, about two inches below the navel and two inches in.
  • Emotional issues: Sense of abundance, well-being, pleasure and sexuality.

   

 

3. Solar Plexus Chakra — Our ability to be confident and in control of our lives.

  • Location: Upper abdomen in the stomach area.
  • Emotional issues: Self-worth, self-confidence and self-esteem.

   

  
 

4. Heart Chakra — Our ability to love.

  • Location: Center of chest just above the heart.
  • Emotional issues: Love, joy and inner peace.

 

  

  

  
  

 
5. Throat Chakra — Our ability to communicate

  • Location: Throat.
  • Emotional issues: Communication, self-expression of feelings and the truth

  

   

 
   

6. Third Eye Chakra — Our ability to focus on and see the big picture.

  • Location: Forehead between the eyes (also called the Brow Chakra).
  • Emotional issues: Intuition, imagination, wisdom and the ability to think and make decisions

   
   

 

  
 
  

7. Crown Chakra — The highest chakra represents our ability to be fully connected spiritually.

  • Location: The very top of the head.
  • Emotional issues: Inner and outer beauty, our connection to spirituality and pure bliss.

  

  

  

  

 


Status

Circadian Rhythm and Bipolar Disease Explained

blog pic 3

imagesELNJ79V4

Click Below to Read the Full Article:

Circadian Rhythms and Bipolar Disorder

 

“The nervous systems of people with bipolar disorders frequently make specific types of regulatory errors. Many of them involve the body’s internal clock, which controls the phenomena known as circadian rhythms. These are the regular rhythmic changes in waking and sleeping, waxing and waning activity levels, even sensations of hunger or thirst and their satisfaction. The chemical clock that governs these rhythms is located in a part of the hypothalamus gland called the suprachiasmatic nucleus, which (among other things) regulates the pineal gland’s secretion of the hormone melatonin.”

 

 

blog pic

blog pic 4

 

 

“You’ve probably heard about melatonin supplements sold as a cure for insomnia. Indeed, this hormone is the body’s own shut-down mechanism, and production of it usually kicks in as dusk begins. The suprachiasmatic nucleus sets itself based on the past several days’ pattern of light and dark, slowly adjusting itself in pace with the seasons. It does seem important for people to be exposed to at least some strong, direct light (sunlight or artificial) around mid-day, and for the overall patterns of dark and light to change slowly and naturally. People with bipolar disorders appear to have more difficulty in regulating this system. It’s a chicken-and-egg situation: the rhythms are disordered, so sleep, waking, and other patterns are disturbed. As insomnia, oversleeping, changes in eating habits, and higher or lower activity levels set in, the clock gets harder to reset, and the person becomes more and more ill.”

 

blog pic 6

 

 

 

chinese-biological-clock

 

“The production of the neurotransmitter serotonin is also affected by a reduced amount of light in the environment. Neurotransmitters are hormone-like chemicals that send signals to all parts of the nervous system. Serotonin affects mood, appetite, and much more. In people with bipolar disorders, serotonin and other neurotransmitters may be created in the wrong amounts, absorbed by the wrong parts of the brain or other sites, or refused admittance at sites that should accept them.”

 

blog pic 2

 

 

association-between-circadian-rhythm-genes-and-metabolic-syndrome-in-patients-with-bipolar-disorder-9-638

 

For more about this great topic, please read the following article. It is very in-depth and newer than most of the other information found on the Internet. Please share this information with loved ones who may be suffering, or with a friend to spread the word. 

Seeking Synchrony
 

 

 

Status

How to Keep Your Self-Esteem High

  

Check out the links below to read and learn more!



  • Keep a Healthy Self-Esteem  

 

  • Low Self-Esteem v High Self-Esteem

  

  • Confidence v Insecurity 

  

  • Improve Your Confidence 

  

   

  • Try Creating a Self-Esteem Journal

  • How to Bounce Back From Low Confidence 

  

  • Ways to Improve Self-Esteem

  

  • YOU CAN DO IT!!!

  
 

Status

A Neuroscientist Explains What Happens To Your Brain When You Meditate

Source: Collective-Evolution   
“Meditation is becoming very popular lately. Perhaps it’s the anecdotal evidence friends are sharing with each other or the fact that more and more science is coming out to confirm the benefits of meditation that it’s encouraging people to take up the practice. Meditation has shown to decrease stress, increase happiness,quality of life, increase gray matter in the brain, making people more compassionate, lowering blood pressure, increasing memory and more. A great series of benefits from such a peaceful practice.”

  

“Meditation can be discouraging at times. It’s not easy to calm your mind, stop the thoughts and get into a space that is quiet. Since many of us, especially in western culture, are never taught to explore this practice at a young age it can be even harder to get into a quiet meditative space realizing that we are not our thoughts or mind. If you are discouraged you can get some tips here. If you are looking for some great ways to get into meditation, you can check these out.”
What Happens When You Meditate ? 
“A group of Harvard neuroscientists came together to study the benefits of meditation on the brain and how it affects mindfulness. Sara Lazar enrolled her team of 16 subjects in a 8 week mindfulness program to see if meditation, over a short period of time, could begin to create changes in lifestyle and the brain.”

  

“The subjects were given a 45 minute guided mindfulness exercise to be used daily and they were encouraged to do various daily activities with as much mindfulness as possible. On average the subjects performed about 27 minutes of mindfulness each day.”

  

“Britta Hölzel, the lead author on the paper says, “It is fascinating to see the brain’s plasticity and that, by practicing meditation, we can play an active role in changing the brain and can increase our well-being and quality of life.””

  
“One of the biggest things that happens to our brains when we meditate is that it stops processing so much information. Beta waves generally indicate a processing of information. When beta waves are decreased, we see a decrease in information processed. Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging, (MRI) we can see how and where beta waves are decreasing the most. This is indicated by the color changes in the image below.”

  

Taking things a little deeper, the following areas of the brain were affected by meditation in different ways.”


  • Frontal lobe

“This is the most highly evolved part of the brain, responsible for reasoning, planning, emotions and self-conscious awareness. During meditation, the frontal cortex tends to go offline.”

  

  • Parietal lobe

“This part of the brain processes sensory information about the surrounding world, orienting you in time and space. During meditation, activity in the parietal lobe slows down.”

  

  • Thalamus

“The gatekeeper for the senses, this organ focuses your attention by funneling some sensory data deeper into the brain and stopping other signals in their tracks. Meditation reduces the flow of incoming information to a trickle.”

  
  

  • Reticular formation

“As the brain’s sentry, this structure receives incoming stimuli and puts the brain on alert, ready to respond. Meditating dials back the arousal signal.”

  
  

““This study demonstrates that changes in brain structure may underlie some of these reported improvements and that people are not just feeling better because they are spending time relaxing.” Sarah Lazar Ph.D., the study’s senior author.”
Societal Benefits For The Bigger Picture

“When we begin to consider the benefits of meditation we can start to imagine how different our world might look if everyone, or even the majority of people began practicing meditation more regularly. Could an increase in mindfulness, happiness, care, and empathy for others make an impact on our world? How about reduced stress and better memory? As opposed to many of the practices we do in our society today, drinking, smoking, drug use, pharmaceuticals for EVERYTHING, television, which are all seen as generally acceptable, imagine if a portion of the time spent doing things destructive to our body and mind was replaced with meditation instead. What might the outcome look like?”

“Certainly some interesting things to ponder when you realize that many of the issues we see today in our world on a daily basis stem from a lack of mindfulness and a take over of egoic individuality where we lose sight of how our actions might affect others or how we can get caught up in taking things personally. For example, studies have shown that meditation makes people connect better with others and feel more compassionate towards them. Given how many of our daily and worldly challenges stem from seeing others as a problem to our own lives, isn’t it fair to say that suddenly seeing beyond these perceived perceptions and gaining a connection to others could instead create a more peaceful and joyous reality?”
“I feel that many of our worlds problems are not necessarily due to the structures around us presenting limitations but because the consciousness or mindset that acts as the foundation for our world is creating this experience. To change our world from the source, a change in mindset (consciousness or world view) would trigger a different understanding of how we could live and create our world. Instead of simply operating from belief and programming as we do today, we could strip that away and create from a space connected with our hearts and true selves, something I believe would drastically change our world.”

Want to learn more? Check out these articles: 

  1. This is Your Brain On Meditation
  2. Meditation Can Change the Brain

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: