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National Taco Day

National Taco Day


            

Celebrate National Taco Day!

  • “Last year Americans ate over 4.5 billion tacos!”
  • “That’s 490,000 miles of tacos, which could take you to the moon and back or, if you prefer, could, at 775-million pounds, equal the weight of two Empire State Buildings.”


            

​Source: National Taco Day








How about some fresh seafood tacos? Here’s my favorite recipe. 

Shrimp Tacos with Cabbage

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound medium-sized Florida shrimp, peeled
  • 8 corn or flour tortillas
  • 1/4 cup fresh cilantro, chopped
  • 2 cups Florida cabbage, shredded
  • 2 Florida tomatoes, diced
  • 1 tablespoon hot pepper sauce (your favorite)
  • 1 fresh lime, juiced
  • vegetable oil (cooking)
  • 1/2 cup plain yogurt
  • 1 teaspoon dried cumin
  • sea salt and fresh ground pepper to taste


Directions:

  1. Wrap tortillas in foil and warm in 300-degree oven.
  2. Preheat a medium-sized sauté pan over medium-high heat.
  3. In a small mixing bowl, combine the yogurt, lime juice, cumin and hot sauce.
  4. Stir ingredients to combine.
  5. Taste, adjusting seasoning with salt and pepper.
  6. Set aside the yogurt sauce for later.
  7. Lightly season the shrimp with salt and pepper.
  8. Add 1 tablespoon of oil to the preheated sauté pan.
  9. Carefully add the seasoned shrimp to the sauté pan.
  10. Cook for 2 to 4 minutes or until completely done throughout.
  11. Assemble tacos by starting with a tortilla, then layer cabbage, cilantro and tomatoes.
  12. Place an even portion of shrimp on top of the vegetables.
  13. Spoon some of the yogurt sauce on top of the shrimp.
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Compare & Contrast – Presidential Candidates 

Compare & Contrast – 2016 Presidential Candidates 

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Why don’t white people believe people of color about racism? — Of Means and Ends

After the tragic police shootings of Terence Crutcher and Keith Lamont Scott, some white people fell into a typical offensive behavior pattern. Despite damning video evidence, they want to know more about the story. They insist that if black people only behaved a certain way, and taught their children to do the same, they wouldn’t […]

via Why don’t white people believe people of color about racism? — Of Means and Ends

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Google Starts Including AMP Content in Mobile Search Results

“Company promises faster access to news articles and other content from mobile devices.”

  

Google has begun including links to “Accelerated Mobile Pages” in search results, which it said will help Internet users access news articles and other Web content faster from their mobile devices.

When users search for news stories or topics on Google from mobile devices, Web pages created using the new technology may now appear in a dedicated “Top Stories” section at the top of search results pages.

  
Google announced the Accelerated Mobile Pages project, or AMP, in October, and publishers and media companies have since been preparing their websites and publishing systems to deliver AMP versions of their content. In early testing, Google said AMP content loaded an average of four times faster and used 10 times less data than equivalent non-AMP pages.
“The feedback from publishers so far has been very enthusiastic. Everyone is excited to make the Web faster,” said Dave Besbris, Google’s vice president of engineering.

  
Dozens of companies are already publishing content using the AMP specifications, including the New York Times, BuzzFeed, Time Inc., BBC, Vox Media, ABC News, Gannett, the Financial Times and The Wall Street Journal. Now, that AMP content will be accessible through Google search results and highlighted with a green lightning bolt icon.

   
 

Despite the speed and data advantages for consumers, the question remains whether AMP will prove beneficial to publishers in terms of increased traffic, engagement, or revenue.

  

“We’ve been working with Google for a number of months. We want to be an early adopter, and we recognize AMP as an opportunity to get stories into the hands of our users faster,” said Colby Smith, vice president of digital at ABC News.
Popular blogging platform and content management system WordPress is also supporting the initiative, potentially adding AMP versions of content to millions of websites using WordPress software.

  
“We want to make it really easy for publishers of all shapes and sizes to publish AMP-formatted pages, from the New York Post all the way down to people running their own personal blogs,” said Paul Maiorana, vice president of platform services at WordPress.com parent company Automattic.

  

Under the hood, AMP works by simplifying and streamlining the HTML code that powers Web pages to prioritize speed. Google also “caches” pages, or saves copies of them on its own systems, in order to deliver them quicker when users access them. It’s an open-source initiative, meaning anyone is free to use it.
According to Google’s Mr. Besbris, over 5,800 developers have now engaged with the AMP project, including publishers, but also online advertising and publishing technology companies wanting to ensure their tools function with AMP.
“This really is the Web ecosystem. That means the publishers get a choice of a wide variety of tech solutions including analytics solutions and ad providers,” Mr. Besbris said.

  
Indeed, technology and advertising companies have been quick to announce their compatibility with AMP, including content recommendation services such as Taboola and Revcontent, online analytics providers including Chartbeat, Parse.ly and Adobe, and a range of ad networks.

  
 

“We are huge believers in advertising, and we believe content needs funding whether that’s through ads or through paywalls. We want ads to perform well and publishers to have a wide variety of ad networks and ad tech to choose from,” Mr. Besbris said. “It’s our goal to ensure these pages monetize very well.”

  
However, publishers’ AMP pages do not currently have all the functionality of their regular pages. For example, some ad formats, such as interstitials, will not work with AMP, as well as some complex online ad sales technologies. Mr. Besbris said those limitations are primarily in place to help promote the speedy loading of AMP pages.
Google’s AMP initiative is just one of many content delivery options now available to online publishers. Facebook, for example, recently launched its own Instant Articles product, which enables publishers to host content directly with the social network instead of driving users back to their own websites. Part of the sales pitch for Instant Articles was that news stories would load faster on mobile devices.

  

The difference with AMP pages, however, is that publishers host the content themselves, with Google saving or “caching” AMP pages temporarily to speed up their loading times.

  

“We haven’t heard concerns around caching from publishers. The difference here with caching versus hosting is control over the content. It’s fully under publishers’ control because it’s their file hosted by their site,” Mr. Besbris said.
Because of this distinction, some publishers say they are less leery of Google’s approach.
“I think of it as very different arrangement to Facebook Instant Articles. We feel much more in control of the content because of the fact this is hosted on our servers and our business model travels with it,” said Kate Harris, a mobile product director at the New York Times.
Google is the first company to begin distributing AMP pages through its services, but others may follow. Twitter group product manager Michael Ducker said users generally consume more pages through the company’s mobile application when they load quickly.
“It’s better for Twitter to have a mobile app that’s fast”, Mr. Ducker said, adding, “We’re not announcing anything now around integrating AMP pages into our clients, but we do believe AMP is the way forward.”

 

To read more:

Wall Street Journal 

Status

Google Starts Including AMP Content in Mobile Search Results

“Company promises faster access to news articles and other content from mobile devices.”

  

Google has begun including links to “Accelerated Mobile Pages” in search results, which it said will help Internet users access news articles and other Web content faster from their mobile devices.

When users search for news stories or topics on Google from mobile devices, Web pages created using the new technology may now appear in a dedicated “Top Stories” section at the top of search results pages.

  
Google announced the Accelerated Mobile Pages project, or AMP, in October, and publishers and media companies have since been preparing their websites and publishing systems to deliver AMP versions of their content. In early testing, Google said AMP content loaded an average of four times faster and used 10 times less data than equivalent non-AMP pages.
“The feedback from publishers so far has been very enthusiastic. Everyone is excited to make the Web faster,” said Dave Besbris, Google’s vice president of engineering.

  
Dozens of companies are already publishing content using the AMP specifications, including the New York Times, BuzzFeed, Time Inc., BBC, Vox Media, ABC News, Gannett, the Financial Times and The Wall Street Journal. Now, that AMP content will be accessible through Google search results and highlighted with a green lightning bolt icon.

   
 

Despite the speed and data advantages for consumers, the question remains whether AMP will prove beneficial to publishers in terms of increased traffic, engagement, or revenue.

  

“We’ve been working with Google for a number of months. We want to be an early adopter, and we recognize AMP as an opportunity to get stories into the hands of our users faster,” said Colby Smith, vice president of digital at ABC News.
Popular blogging platform and content management system WordPress is also supporting the initiative, potentially adding AMP versions of content to millions of websites using WordPress software.

  
“We want to make it really easy for publishers of all shapes and sizes to publish AMP-formatted pages, from the New York Post all the way down to people running their own personal blogs,” said Paul Maiorana, vice president of platform services at WordPress.com parent company Automattic.

  

Under the hood, AMP works by simplifying and streamlining the HTML code that powers Web pages to prioritize speed. Google also “caches” pages, or saves copies of them on its own systems, in order to deliver them quicker when users access them. It’s an open-source initiative, meaning anyone is free to use it.
According to Google’s Mr. Besbris, over 5,800 developers have now engaged with the AMP project, including publishers, but also online advertising and publishing technology companies wanting to ensure their tools function with AMP.
“This really is the Web ecosystem. That means the publishers get a choice of a wide variety of tech solutions including analytics solutions and ad providers,” Mr. Besbris said.

  
Indeed, technology and advertising companies have been quick to announce their compatibility with AMP, including content recommendation services such as Taboola and Revcontent, online analytics providers including Chartbeat, Parse.ly and Adobe, and a range of ad networks.

  
 

“We are huge believers in advertising, and we believe content needs funding whether that’s through ads or through paywalls. We want ads to perform well and publishers to have a wide variety of ad networks and ad tech to choose from,” Mr. Besbris said. “It’s our goal to ensure these pages monetize very well.”

  
However, publishers’ AMP pages do not currently have all the functionality of their regular pages. For example, some ad formats, such as interstitials, will not work with AMP, as well as some complex online ad sales technologies. Mr. Besbris said those limitations are primarily in place to help promote the speedy loading of AMP pages.
Google’s AMP initiative is just one of many content delivery options now available to online publishers. Facebook, for example, recently launched its own Instant Articles product, which enables publishers to host content directly with the social network instead of driving users back to their own websites. Part of the sales pitch for Instant Articles was that news stories would load faster on mobile devices.

  

The difference with AMP pages, however, is that publishers host the content themselves, with Google saving or “caching” AMP pages temporarily to speed up their loading times.

  

“We haven’t heard concerns around caching from publishers. The difference here with caching versus hosting is control over the content. It’s fully under publishers’ control because it’s their file hosted by their site,” Mr. Besbris said.
Because of this distinction, some publishers say they are less leery of Google’s approach.
“I think of it as very different arrangement to Facebook Instant Articles. We feel much more in control of the content because of the fact this is hosted on our servers and our business model travels with it,” said Kate Harris, a mobile product director at the New York Times.
Google is the first company to begin distributing AMP pages through its services, but others may follow. Twitter group product manager Michael Ducker said users generally consume more pages through the company’s mobile application when they load quickly.
“It’s better for Twitter to have a mobile app that’s fast”, Mr. Ducker said, adding, “We’re not announcing anything now around integrating AMP pages into our clients, but we do believe AMP is the way forward.”

  

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How Writer’s Make a Boring Topic Interesting 

  
Write Intriguingly    

“It’s no fun to come up with blog ideas for the boring industries outside of search engine optimization (SEO) and marketing. You know what I mean—the real world of forklifts, car dealerships, garden furniture and bedding. Even coming up with new content for your blog can be a bit tough.”

  
“Every day my blog-writing service must come up with 10-20 blog post ideas for clients in a number of diverse industries. Sometimes the industries are easy, like mobile phones or SEO, but more often than not we need blog post ideas for companies in less interesting industries. (No offense intended).”

  
“I’m going to share how we brainstorm content ideas so you can always come up with some—even on those uninspiring rainy days.”

  • Pull from magazines.
  • Play word association games: A great way to do this is to get some members of your team. One person starts with a root word. This could be the name of the industry you or your client is in. The next person says something related to that root word.

It might go a little like this:

  • SEO (root word)
  • Link building
  • Marketing
  • Advertising
  • Copywriting
  • Writing

  
“Don’t get too far from your root word, but by thinking of out of the box content ideas, you can explore some similar and complementary areas to your client’s sector. I started with “SEO,” but ended with “copywriting” and “writing,” which are topics those in SEO could be interested in.”

  • Borrow from other industries
  • Use Flipboard: “Flipboard is a great way to come up with blog post ideas because it gets you away from your desk (it is only available on tablets and mobile devices), and it’s intuitive to use. Flipping through articles on any given topic can do great things to inspire the brain.”
  • Browse spammy curator sites: “I don’t know the correct term for these sites, but I sometimes stumble across them when I get lost on the Web. I bet you’ve come across a few, too. They are basically sites about celebrities, strange and unbelievable things or crazy things. Sometimes they just curate stories and send you to another site. They do a lot of traffic sharing, and make money from ads. These sites won’t help you come up with actual content, but they will give you some great title ideas. The people that make these sites and write the titles are pretty clever. They know what makes people click.”

  

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Vote for 2016 Legalization

  
Florida Are You Ready To Legalize Marijuana?
  
While the state of Florida continues to pussyfoot around with the implementation of a CBD-only law, the stage is being set to to legalize a full-scale medical marijuana program in 2016. United For Care, whose proposal to legalize the leaf for medicinal purposes failed by a narrow margin in last year’s November election, is now preparing to launch the second coming of the initiative in hopes of bringing medicinal herb to the Sunshine State once and for all. 

  
Although the campaign has not been formally announced, several reports have indicated that Orlando attorney John Morgan and his band of supporters, collectively known as United for Care, will begin grinding the pavement later this month to collect the signatures required to earn a spot on the ballot in the next presidential election.

   

The biggest obstacle, so far, is that the group has not been able to raise the funds needed to run a successful campaign—ballot initiatives require millions of dollars to bring the effort to fruition. An article in the Orlando Sentinel suggests that the group has only raised about $50,000 for the 2016 effort. 
However, the organization is still reportedly sitting on a portion of its financial arsenal from 2014. The next step is rebuilding the momentum for the cause—collecting the necessary signatures, while putting the initiative in a position to gain the additional 2 percent of the voters that it was unable to secure last year.
Florida law dictates that voter initiatives receive 60 percent approval in order to become law. Last year’s Amendment 2 secured only 58 percent.

   

 

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