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Google Starts Including AMP Content in Mobile Search Results

“Company promises faster access to news articles and other content from mobile devices.”

  

Google has begun including links to “Accelerated Mobile Pages” in search results, which it said will help Internet users access news articles and other Web content faster from their mobile devices.

When users search for news stories or topics on Google from mobile devices, Web pages created using the new technology may now appear in a dedicated “Top Stories” section at the top of search results pages.

  
Google announced the Accelerated Mobile Pages project, or AMP, in October, and publishers and media companies have since been preparing their websites and publishing systems to deliver AMP versions of their content. In early testing, Google said AMP content loaded an average of four times faster and used 10 times less data than equivalent non-AMP pages.
“The feedback from publishers so far has been very enthusiastic. Everyone is excited to make the Web faster,” said Dave Besbris, Google’s vice president of engineering.

  
Dozens of companies are already publishing content using the AMP specifications, including the New York Times, BuzzFeed, Time Inc., BBC, Vox Media, ABC News, Gannett, the Financial Times and The Wall Street Journal. Now, that AMP content will be accessible through Google search results and highlighted with a green lightning bolt icon.

   
 

Despite the speed and data advantages for consumers, the question remains whether AMP will prove beneficial to publishers in terms of increased traffic, engagement, or revenue.

  

“We’ve been working with Google for a number of months. We want to be an early adopter, and we recognize AMP as an opportunity to get stories into the hands of our users faster,” said Colby Smith, vice president of digital at ABC News.
Popular blogging platform and content management system WordPress is also supporting the initiative, potentially adding AMP versions of content to millions of websites using WordPress software.

  
“We want to make it really easy for publishers of all shapes and sizes to publish AMP-formatted pages, from the New York Post all the way down to people running their own personal blogs,” said Paul Maiorana, vice president of platform services at WordPress.com parent company Automattic.

  

Under the hood, AMP works by simplifying and streamlining the HTML code that powers Web pages to prioritize speed. Google also “caches” pages, or saves copies of them on its own systems, in order to deliver them quicker when users access them. It’s an open-source initiative, meaning anyone is free to use it.
According to Google’s Mr. Besbris, over 5,800 developers have now engaged with the AMP project, including publishers, but also online advertising and publishing technology companies wanting to ensure their tools function with AMP.
“This really is the Web ecosystem. That means the publishers get a choice of a wide variety of tech solutions including analytics solutions and ad providers,” Mr. Besbris said.

  
Indeed, technology and advertising companies have been quick to announce their compatibility with AMP, including content recommendation services such as Taboola and Revcontent, online analytics providers including Chartbeat, Parse.ly and Adobe, and a range of ad networks.

  
 

“We are huge believers in advertising, and we believe content needs funding whether that’s through ads or through paywalls. We want ads to perform well and publishers to have a wide variety of ad networks and ad tech to choose from,” Mr. Besbris said. “It’s our goal to ensure these pages monetize very well.”

  
However, publishers’ AMP pages do not currently have all the functionality of their regular pages. For example, some ad formats, such as interstitials, will not work with AMP, as well as some complex online ad sales technologies. Mr. Besbris said those limitations are primarily in place to help promote the speedy loading of AMP pages.
Google’s AMP initiative is just one of many content delivery options now available to online publishers. Facebook, for example, recently launched its own Instant Articles product, which enables publishers to host content directly with the social network instead of driving users back to their own websites. Part of the sales pitch for Instant Articles was that news stories would load faster on mobile devices.

  

The difference with AMP pages, however, is that publishers host the content themselves, with Google saving or “caching” AMP pages temporarily to speed up their loading times.

  

“We haven’t heard concerns around caching from publishers. The difference here with caching versus hosting is control over the content. It’s fully under publishers’ control because it’s their file hosted by their site,” Mr. Besbris said.
Because of this distinction, some publishers say they are less leery of Google’s approach.
“I think of it as very different arrangement to Facebook Instant Articles. We feel much more in control of the content because of the fact this is hosted on our servers and our business model travels with it,” said Kate Harris, a mobile product director at the New York Times.
Google is the first company to begin distributing AMP pages through its services, but others may follow. Twitter group product manager Michael Ducker said users generally consume more pages through the company’s mobile application when they load quickly.
“It’s better for Twitter to have a mobile app that’s fast”, Mr. Ducker said, adding, “We’re not announcing anything now around integrating AMP pages into our clients, but we do believe AMP is the way forward.”

 

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Google Starts Including AMP Content in Mobile Search Results

“Company promises faster access to news articles and other content from mobile devices.”

  

Google has begun including links to “Accelerated Mobile Pages” in search results, which it said will help Internet users access news articles and other Web content faster from their mobile devices.

When users search for news stories or topics on Google from mobile devices, Web pages created using the new technology may now appear in a dedicated “Top Stories” section at the top of search results pages.

  
Google announced the Accelerated Mobile Pages project, or AMP, in October, and publishers and media companies have since been preparing their websites and publishing systems to deliver AMP versions of their content. In early testing, Google said AMP content loaded an average of four times faster and used 10 times less data than equivalent non-AMP pages.
“The feedback from publishers so far has been very enthusiastic. Everyone is excited to make the Web faster,” said Dave Besbris, Google’s vice president of engineering.

  
Dozens of companies are already publishing content using the AMP specifications, including the New York Times, BuzzFeed, Time Inc., BBC, Vox Media, ABC News, Gannett, the Financial Times and The Wall Street Journal. Now, that AMP content will be accessible through Google search results and highlighted with a green lightning bolt icon.

   
 

Despite the speed and data advantages for consumers, the question remains whether AMP will prove beneficial to publishers in terms of increased traffic, engagement, or revenue.

  

“We’ve been working with Google for a number of months. We want to be an early adopter, and we recognize AMP as an opportunity to get stories into the hands of our users faster,” said Colby Smith, vice president of digital at ABC News.
Popular blogging platform and content management system WordPress is also supporting the initiative, potentially adding AMP versions of content to millions of websites using WordPress software.

  
“We want to make it really easy for publishers of all shapes and sizes to publish AMP-formatted pages, from the New York Post all the way down to people running their own personal blogs,” said Paul Maiorana, vice president of platform services at WordPress.com parent company Automattic.

  

Under the hood, AMP works by simplifying and streamlining the HTML code that powers Web pages to prioritize speed. Google also “caches” pages, or saves copies of them on its own systems, in order to deliver them quicker when users access them. It’s an open-source initiative, meaning anyone is free to use it.
According to Google’s Mr. Besbris, over 5,800 developers have now engaged with the AMP project, including publishers, but also online advertising and publishing technology companies wanting to ensure their tools function with AMP.
“This really is the Web ecosystem. That means the publishers get a choice of a wide variety of tech solutions including analytics solutions and ad providers,” Mr. Besbris said.

  
Indeed, technology and advertising companies have been quick to announce their compatibility with AMP, including content recommendation services such as Taboola and Revcontent, online analytics providers including Chartbeat, Parse.ly and Adobe, and a range of ad networks.

  
 

“We are huge believers in advertising, and we believe content needs funding whether that’s through ads or through paywalls. We want ads to perform well and publishers to have a wide variety of ad networks and ad tech to choose from,” Mr. Besbris said. “It’s our goal to ensure these pages monetize very well.”

  
However, publishers’ AMP pages do not currently have all the functionality of their regular pages. For example, some ad formats, such as interstitials, will not work with AMP, as well as some complex online ad sales technologies. Mr. Besbris said those limitations are primarily in place to help promote the speedy loading of AMP pages.
Google’s AMP initiative is just one of many content delivery options now available to online publishers. Facebook, for example, recently launched its own Instant Articles product, which enables publishers to host content directly with the social network instead of driving users back to their own websites. Part of the sales pitch for Instant Articles was that news stories would load faster on mobile devices.

  

The difference with AMP pages, however, is that publishers host the content themselves, with Google saving or “caching” AMP pages temporarily to speed up their loading times.

  

“We haven’t heard concerns around caching from publishers. The difference here with caching versus hosting is control over the content. It’s fully under publishers’ control because it’s their file hosted by their site,” Mr. Besbris said.
Because of this distinction, some publishers say they are less leery of Google’s approach.
“I think of it as very different arrangement to Facebook Instant Articles. We feel much more in control of the content because of the fact this is hosted on our servers and our business model travels with it,” said Kate Harris, a mobile product director at the New York Times.
Google is the first company to begin distributing AMP pages through its services, but others may follow. Twitter group product manager Michael Ducker said users generally consume more pages through the company’s mobile application when they load quickly.
“It’s better for Twitter to have a mobile app that’s fast”, Mr. Ducker said, adding, “We’re not announcing anything now around integrating AMP pages into our clients, but we do believe AMP is the way forward.”

  

Status

How Writer’s Make a Boring Topic Interesting 

  
Write Intriguingly    

“It’s no fun to come up with blog ideas for the boring industries outside of search engine optimization (SEO) and marketing. You know what I mean—the real world of forklifts, car dealerships, garden furniture and bedding. Even coming up with new content for your blog can be a bit tough.”

  
“Every day my blog-writing service must come up with 10-20 blog post ideas for clients in a number of diverse industries. Sometimes the industries are easy, like mobile phones or SEO, but more often than not we need blog post ideas for companies in less interesting industries. (No offense intended).”

  
“I’m going to share how we brainstorm content ideas so you can always come up with some—even on those uninspiring rainy days.”

  • Pull from magazines.
  • Play word association games: A great way to do this is to get some members of your team. One person starts with a root word. This could be the name of the industry you or your client is in. The next person says something related to that root word.

It might go a little like this:

  • SEO (root word)
  • Link building
  • Marketing
  • Advertising
  • Copywriting
  • Writing

  
“Don’t get too far from your root word, but by thinking of out of the box content ideas, you can explore some similar and complementary areas to your client’s sector. I started with “SEO,” but ended with “copywriting” and “writing,” which are topics those in SEO could be interested in.”

  • Borrow from other industries
  • Use Flipboard: “Flipboard is a great way to come up with blog post ideas because it gets you away from your desk (it is only available on tablets and mobile devices), and it’s intuitive to use. Flipping through articles on any given topic can do great things to inspire the brain.”
  • Browse spammy curator sites: “I don’t know the correct term for these sites, but I sometimes stumble across them when I get lost on the Web. I bet you’ve come across a few, too. They are basically sites about celebrities, strange and unbelievable things or crazy things. Sometimes they just curate stories and send you to another site. They do a lot of traffic sharing, and make money from ads. These sites won’t help you come up with actual content, but they will give you some great title ideas. The people that make these sites and write the titles are pretty clever. They know what makes people click.”

  

Gallery

Happy 1,000 Post!!!

I just posted my 1000th blog post at at petitegirlsguide here on WordPress!!!

  
   
   
   
    
    
 

Status

Five Tips to Make Your Content Stand Out From the Crowd

  

Make Your Content Stand Out“Nine out of 10 B2B marketers are actively using content marketing, regardless of their size or industry.”

“Here are some lessons learning from the world of content marketing.”

  

1. Focus on engagement

“The objective of content marketing has shifted from lead generation to developing effective engagement. A total of 88% of marketers now view the primary goals of content marketing to be enhancing customer loyalty and prospect/customer engagement, according to a survey by Smart Insights.”

“There is no shortage of content, so marketers need to find ways to enhance the customer experience by going beyond a presentation or a whitepaper. Marketers need an interactive engagement to keep their prospects and customers actively involved.”

“Using content marketing to deliver a compelling story allows marketers to build an emotional connection with the audience, bringing to life the information and making it relevant, interesting, and useful.”

“When people are involved in digesting information via an interactive experience (as compared with a passive experience, such as watching a video or reading a whitepaper), they retain up to three times as much information.”

“In an interactive experience, each piece of content is only presented when and where the user chooses, ensuring that each person gets to navigate a highly relevant and more individual understanding of the products and solutions. Each user decides what sections to explore, and in what sequence and level of detail.”

 
 2. Show, don’t tell

“Experience has demonstrated that visuals combined with text copy are much more effective than either text or visuals alone.”

“The content marketing tactic that increased the most in 2014 was infographics. When multiple senses are employed in processing information, the level of retention increases.”

“As the world moves towards more bite-sized chunks of information (e.g., 140-character tweets), the use of visual imagery to convey important information becomes more effective. The combination of well-designed text copy in concert with visuals dramatically enhances the cognitive processes used when reading or scanning documents, and this is incredibly useful for content marketers.”

“Rather than discussing an increase in product functionality over time, for example, a thought-provoking chart with a clear depiction of a rising arrow sends the message that grabs the reader’s attention. The complementary text describing how the product’s functionality has expanded reinforces the underlying message by both adding credibility and creating specific information the reader remembers.”

  
3. Make content personal

“Though the marketing team strives for delivering a consistent message about solutions and products, the way that the prospect experiences the message can be highly personalized to suit his or her needs.”

“Personalization will continue to be a focus of marketing attention for the rest of 2015, especially with the continuing development of marketing automation tools that allow for more unique and relevant deliverables.”

“Marketers in companies of all sizes can directly target customers based on specific titles, needs/wants, and stage in the buyer’s journey, which means not only personalizing email greetings but delivering specialized content to each category of user. If customers are reading, comprehending, and interacting with the meaningful content created and sent to them, they will have an elevated experience and greater knowledge retention. That translates into increased usage and sales.”

“Some 78% of the most successful marketers are creating more content than they did a year ago, so delivering a more relevant and personalized piece of content is becoming more necessary (and effective).”

  
4. Reuse and repurpose content

“Forbes recently reported that 69% of CEOs believe that their marketing organizations waste money on redundant marketing initiatives. Apparently, marketers agree.”

  
“Successful marketers know that by maximizing their investments through repurposing their deliverables, they can help alleviate this concern. In a 2014 survey, conducted by MarketingProfs and the Content Marketing Institute, 86% of CMOs said they were also looking for ways to repurpose content across new platforms within the next 12months, without recreating or reformatting it in any way.”

“Rather than creating individual marketing deliverables for each event or product launch, and instead of spending money on content specific to a channel or device, focus on reusing and repurposing the same content marketing applications across any device or marketing channel.”

  
“Similar to responsive design, new marketing platforms (like the Kaon Application Delivery Network) are finally allowing for interactive content to be created once and deployed everywhere (mobile devices, tablets, desktops, websites, touch screens, etc.). This gives companies the ability to create one cost-effective “user-driven” piece of content that can address multiple constituents within the buying ecosystem, across multiple selling environments (sales meetings, websites, trade shows, briefing centers, training, etc.). Same brand, same message, same value story.”

  
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Five Tips to Make Your Content Stand Out From the Crowd
by Gavin Finn

Published on July 10, 2015

Nine out of 10 B2B marketers are actively using content marketing, regardless of their size or industry.
Here are some lessons learning from the world of content marketing.
1. Focus on engagement
The objective of content marketing has shifted from lead generation to developing effective engagement. A total of 88% of marketers now view the primary goals of content marketing to be enhancing customer loyalty and prospect/customer engagement, according to a survey by Smart Insights.
There is no shortage of content, so marketers need to find ways to enhance the customer experience by going beyond a presentation or a whitepaper. Marketers need an interactive engagement to keep their prospects and customers actively involved.
Using content marketing to deliver a compelling story allows marketers to build an emotional connection with the audience, bringing to life the information and making it relevant, interesting, and useful.
When people are involved in digesting information via an interactive experience (as compared with a passive experience, such as watching a video or reading a whitepaper), they retain up to three times as much information.
In an interactive experience, each piece of content is only presented when and where the user chooses, ensuring that each person gets to navigate a highly relevant and more individual understanding of the products and solutions. Each user decides what sections to explore, and in what sequence and level of detail.
2. Show, don’t tell
Experience has demonstrated that visuals combined with text copy are much more effective than either text or visuals alone.
The content marketing tactic that increased the most in 2014 was infographics. When multiple senses are employed in processing information, the level of retention increases.
As the world moves towards more bite-sized chunks of information (e.g., 140-character tweets), the use of visual imagery to convey important information becomes more effective. The combination of well-designed text copy in concert with visuals dramatically enhances the cognitive processes used when reading or scanning documents, and this is incredibly useful for content marketers.
Rather than discussing an increase in product functionality over time, for example, a thought-provoking chart with a clear depiction of a rising arrow sends the message that grabs the reader’s attention. The complementary text describing how the product’s functionality has expanded reinforces the underlying message by both adding credibility and creating specific information the reader remembers.
3. Make content personal
Though the marketing team strives for delivering a consistent message about solutions and products, the way that the prospect experiences the message can be highly personalized to suit his or her needs.
Personalization will continue to be a focus of marketing attention for the rest of 2015, especially with the continuing development of marketing automation tools that allow for more unique and relevant deliverables.
Marketers in companies of all sizes can directly target customers based on specific titles, needs/wants, and stage in the buyer’s journey, which means not only personalizing email greetings but delivering specialized content to each category of user. If customers are reading, comprehending, and interacting with the meaningful content created and sent to them, they will have an elevated experience and greater knowledge retention. That translates into increased usage and sales.
Some 78% of the most successful marketers are creating more content than they did a year ago, so delivering a more relevant and personalized piece of content is becoming more necessary (and effective).
4. Reuse and repurpose content
Forbes recently reported that 69% of CEOs believe that their marketing organizations waste money on redundant marketing initiatives. Apparently, marketers agree.
Successful marketers know that by maximizing their investments through repurposing their deliverables, they can help alleviate this concern. In a 2014 survey, conducted by MarketingProfs and the Content Marketing Institute, 86% of CMOs said they were also looking for ways to repurpose content across new platforms within the next 12months, without recreating or reformatting it in any way.
Rather than creating individual marketing deliverables for each event or product launch, and instead of spending money on content specific to a channel or device, focus on reusing and repurposing the same content marketing applications across any device or marketing channel.
Similar to responsive design, new marketing platforms (like the Kaon Application Delivery Network) are finally allowing for interactive content to be created once and deployed everywhere (mobile devices, tablets, desktops, websites, touch screens, etc.). This gives companies the ability to create one cost-effective “user-driven” piece of content that can address multiple constituents within the buying ecosystem, across multiple selling environments (sales meetings, websites, trade shows, briefing centers, training, etc.). Same brand, same message, same value story.
5. Face-to-Face Interactions: The Most Effective Venues

“Though digital marketing is the most common platform for interactive applications, delivering content in an interactive manner can, and does, happen face to face as well.”

“Moreover, just because some piece of content is online does not make it interactive.”

“Being interactive means that there is a dialog, a back and forth between the user and the application, that delivers a personalized, more effective experience. (Think of the difference between watching a video and playing a video game.)”

  

How To Create Engaging Contents For Your Social Media

Prince Mohamed Khan

The first rule of social media marketing is that you don’t push advertisements and contents that people wouldn’t enjoy or entertain.

It is a social network and your contents should be created according to that. The contents should be balanced between marketing and generic. It should keep your target audience engaged and create a meaningful relationship with them.

If you create only marketing content (about yourself and your product) alone and pay a large sum of money for advertising them, it would still be spamming and not marketing.

Some tips for creating social media marketing contents

1. Make it visual

An image speaks more than thousand words.

2. Posting in after hours and weekends

In the working hours people mostly will be occupied  with their works. Generally people will be occupied with their office works during this hours. So, the probability of sewing the posts during this time frame will…

View original post 194 more words

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The 6 Worst Employee Communication Mistakes 

Having Trouble Communicating?  
“Assuming you’ve done a good job of hiring, your employees have skills that contribute to the growth of your business—but that doesn’t mean they’re all great communicators.”

“Business owners often encounter difficulties in getting their employees to better express themselves and interact with others.”

Here are six of the worst employee communication mistakes, with suggestions for improvement:

1. Vague emails, lacking a call to action

“Email communications are so pervasive in our daily lives that it’s easy to forget basic business email etiquette. Among the most common errors:”

“Too wordy, with no clear substance.”

“USE OF ALL CAPITAL LETTERS”

“Vague or misleading title in the subject field.”

“An unprofessional tone (joking, sarcastic, indignant, impolite).”

“No clear call to action.”

•Consider holding a brief “refresher course” or send out helpful tips to get people on the same page. Remind employees to:

“Keep messages concise.”

“Let the email recipient know whether the message is urgent or time-sensitive.”

“Be explicit about what you’re asking for, be it information or action.”

  

2. Failure to double-check spelling and grammar

“Emails with improper grammar and misspelled words are unacceptable when employees communicate with management or, most important, with your customers.”

“Make sure employees understand that spell-check alone doesn’t guarantee an error-free message. They must re-read their messages and ensure that spell-check hasn’t substituted an incorrect word for the one intended. Also, find and fix ambiguous language.”

  

3. Lack of a prompt response to emails from others

“Employers must also take responsibility for getting employees to respond to emails in a timely manner. Don’t indulge in a long-winded message forcing the recipient to puzzle out what to do next.”

“If you need answers, ask specific questions. Request a response by a certain time or date. And restrict the number of people receiving the email. Seeing a long list of recipients, any one employee may think others will respond instead of him or her.”

  

4. Gossiping in the workplace

“Every employer knows how destructive gossip can be. To cope with this human weakness, try these tactics:”

“Indicate a zero-tolerance policy for gossip in your employee handbook. This makes everyone aware of the company’s position from the first day of employment.”

“If you learn about someone gossiping, speak directly to that individual and remind them about your company policy.”

“Share as much information about your business as possible, thus discouraging people’s tendency to speculate in a vacuum of knowledge.”

  
5. Inability to read body language

“Some are more adept than others at reading body language and picking up on nonverbal cues. If your business involves frequent face-to-face encounters, consider holding training sessions in how to read body language, with particular attention paid to:”

“How close or far another person stands while talking to you.”

“The degree of eye contact made.”

“Whether the other person has his or her arms crossed or open.”

“Signs of fidgeting or nervousness (indicating defensiveness or resistance to the speaker’s message).”

“Encourage employees to concentrate more when interacting with co-workers or customers. Stay alert to facial expressions, hand gestures, and other types of body language.”

  

6. Monopolizing meetings

“Some employees are extroverts and tend to dominate meetings, to the detriment of others. How can you discourage this behavior?”

“Politely hold up your hand to indicate you’d like the person to stop speaking.”

“When the employee takes a breath, redirect the conversation to include others.”

“If the problem persists, take the offender aside in private and, while showing you appreciate their input, ask them to hold back or at least limit their comments so others can speak.”

“With positive guidance, employees can learn to avoid these common communication mistakes.”

  

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