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Yoga Ball Chair For Health — atkokosplace

Switching out a “chair” for a yoga ball! What?! Yep, that’s exactly what I did. I use a yoga ball daily for not only exercise but to “sit” on! I’m always looking for ways to be kinder to my body and I’m always looking for ways to exercise while not “exercising” if that makes sense. […]

via Yoga Ball Chair For Health — atkokosplace

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5 treasures I found in my Yoga Teacher Training — Estelea’s Blog

 

When I enrolled to Pascale Wettstein’s Yoga Teacher Training (YTT), it was all for shaping my body. I had no idea I would learn so much about shaping my life … Invaluable Mindfulness I have started to appreciate the meaning of “being present” while practicing yoga poses. After all the hours I spent studying anatomy, learning about lengthening, […]

via 5 treasures I found in my Yoga Teacher Training — Estelea’s Blog

Sciatica Pain Relievers

These simple poses target the tight muscle that often causes sciatic pain: the piriformis.

7 Poses to Soothe Sciatica

“Sciatica has a long (and painful!) history. As far back as the 5th century BCE, doctors and sufferers alike have tried a host of imaginative remedies, from leeches and hot coals in Roman times to 20th-century use of creams and injections. The principle causes of sciatic pain are less mysterious than its heritage suggests, yet there are still millions who suffer from it. In 2005, the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine estimated that more than 5 percent of the adult population in the United States suffers from sciatica, and over a lifetime, an individual has a 40 percent probability of experiencing it. But here’s the good news: in many cases, a mindful, targeted yoga practice can help you overcome the pain.”

“By definition, sciatica is tenderness and pain anywhere along the sciatic nerve, typically showing up on one side of the body. There are two sciatic nerves—one for each leg. These are the longest nerves in the human body. Each originates from several nerve roots that exit from the spinal cord, then thread through apertures in your sacrum and merge to form the main body of the sciatic nerve. The sciatic nerve passes between layers of the deep buttock muscles (gluteus medius and gluteus maximus), through the deep muscles of the back of the thigh, and down through the outer edge of your leg to your foot.”

Symptoms of Sciatica

“Sciatica frequently flares up while bending over, running, sitting (especially driving) and during many other everyday movements, both active and passive. Symptoms can include:

  • Pain anywhere along the sciatic nerve pathway: in the lower back, buttock, back of the thigh, and/or calf.
  • Fatigue, numbness, or loss of feeling in your legs and/or feet.
  • An electric, tingling, burning, pinching, or pins-and-needles feeling known as paresthesia.
  • Weakness that can cause your knees to buckle when you stand up from sitting.
  • Foot drop: a condition in which you are not able to flex your ankles enough to walk on your heels.
  • Reduced reflexes in your Achilles tendon and knee.”

“The presence of sciatic pain often leads doctors to look for a herniated disk in the lumbar spine, which may be pressing against the sciatic nerve. This is a significant problem, and it’s especially important to have your disks checked out by a doctor if you are experiencing pain in your mid-lower back, painful electric shocks down your sciatic nerve, and/or tingling, burning, weakness, or numbness in your legs or feet. These can be signs that an acute herniated disk is pinching the nerve, which is a bigger problem than sciatic pain alone.”

“Sciatica can also be caused by a small but significant muscle deep within your hip—the piriformis. In fact, another 2005 study in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine showed that nearly 70 percent of sciatica cases are caused by this muscle. The piriformis is one of a few small deep hip rotators that you use to turn your thigh out. It also extends your hip when you walk, and abducts the thigh (i.e., takes it out to the side) when your hip is flexed. The sciatic nerve is sandwiched between the piriformis and the small hard tendons that lie against the bone of the sacrum and pelvic bone. If the piriformis is tight (and it often is), it exerts pressure on the sciatic nerve and pushes it against the tendons beneath it, which can cause excruciating pain; this is known as the piriformis syndrome.”

How can you tell if the problem originates in the piriformis? Here are a few indicators:

  • Pain and a pins-and-needles sensation down the outside of your calf to the web space between the little and fourth toes.
  • Difficulty walking on your heels or on your toes.
  • Burning in the back of your thigh and calf down to your heel, with stiffness in your legs. (Note: In some cases this can signal a problem in the spine instead of the piriformis.)
  • Pain from sitting, accompanied by a tingling sensation at the back of your thigh. The pain may be relieved by standing, but you still experience numbness in all of your toes even when standing.
  • Buttock and sciatic pain from exercising or sitting for long periods of time, with or without sensations of numbness, weakness, or tingling. While the pain may appear during standing activities, it gets worse when you sit down.

The Basic Piriformis Stretch: Ardha Matsyendrasana

“A simple half spinal twist (ardha matsyendrasana) gives the piriformis a mild stretch that encourages it to release and lengthen, and the intensity can be progressively increased as you approach the full pose. Stretching the muscle too aggressively can provoke sciatic pain, so it’s important to proceed carefully, using the following variations and adjusting the pose so that you feel minimal discomfort. The descriptions are intended to stretch the piriformis in the left hip; be sure to repeat on the other side.”

Prep for Spinal Twist

“Sit on the corner of a folded blanket with your knees bent and your feet on the floor in front of you. Take your right foot under your left knee and around to the outside of your left hip. Your right knee should point straight forward. For the mildest hip stretch, place your left foot on the floor to the inside of your right knee, so that the left foot is roughly in line with your left hip; for a stronger stretch, place your left foot to the outside of your right knee. It’s likely that your left sit bone is now lighter on the floor than your right. Lean onto your left sit bone to balance the weight between the two hips; this is the beginning of the stretch. Steady yourself by holding your left knee with your hands, and from this balanced foundation, inhale and lengthen upward through your spine. If the stretch is too intense or if you feel pain radiating down your leg, increase the height of the padding under your hips until the stretch is tolerable.”

“If you don’t feel a stretch in your left hip, gently pull your left knee across the midline of your body toward the right side of your chest, keeping your sit bones equally grounded, and resist your thigh slightly against the pull of your hands. This action will help keep your sit bone grounded and increase the stretch to the piriformis.

Stay in the pose anywhere from 20 seconds to a couple of minutes, then repeat on the other side. Do two to four sets at a time. As your piriformis muscles stretch out over time, gradually decrease the height of your blankets until you can sit on the floor.”

Simple Seated Twist

“In the full version of ardha matsyendrasana, your upper body turns toward the upright knee. To help your upper body turn fully, place your left hand on the floor behind you; continue to hold your left knee with your right hand. Keep your heart lifted and keep the natural inward curve in your lower back. Use your inhalation to lift, lengthen, and expand; use your exhalation to twist without rounding your back.”

“Now you can deepen the action on the piriformis by increasing the resisted abduction of the thigh, while releasing any tightness in the groin. As you twist, use your hand on your left knee to gently draw or hug that knee toward your chest. Let your inner thigh or groin relax, allowing it to soften and melt downward toward the sit bone. As you draw the knee toward your chest with resistance, your thigh bone laterally releases out at the hip, pressing against the piriformis and encouraging it to release.”

“The twist deepens as you draw your knee into your elbow or take your upper arm to the outside of your knee. At this point, as you press your knee against the arm to leverage a deeper twist, the pose becomes more active in the hip and less effective as a piriformis release. If you’re suffering from piriformis syndrome, you certainly don’t want to tighten this muscle further, so it’s best not to try to go so deeply into the twist!”

Standing Twist

“The standing twist is a milder standing version of the stretch in ardha matsyendrasana. Like the F.A.I.R. test, it brings the thigh into adduction and internal rotation. Place a chair against the wall. To stretch your right hip, stand with your right side next to the wall. Place your right foot on the chair, with your knee bent to roughly 90 degrees. Keep your standing leg straight, and steady your balance by placing your right hand on the wall. Lift your left heel up high, coming onto the mounds of the toes, and turn your body toward the wall, using your hands for balance. As you exhale, lower your left heel to the floor, maintaining the twist. Allow your right hip to descend, keeping your hips relatively level. Hold for several breaths.”

More Stretches for Sciatica

“Hamstring stretches also play an important role in relieving sciatic pain, because tight hamstrings can gang up with a tight piriformis to constrict the vulnerable sciatic nerve. Sciatic pain caused by a tightening of the hamstrings and surrounding muscles often comes from activities such as driving for long periods, especially when the car seat encourages a slumped or rounded posture, or during athletic activities. In these cases, take a rest stop or a break, and try the following hamstring stretches.”

3 Helpful Hip Openers

“In general, sciatic pain is helped by poses that passively stretch the hip with the thigh externally rotated, but not from poses such as baddha konasana (cobbler’s pose) which actively rotate the thigh outward and thus tighten the deep hip rotators.”

Modified Gomukhasana

“Gomukhasana (cow’s face pose) is a good example of a passive stretch to the hip rotators. Sit on the floor and extend your legs forward in dandasana (staff pose). If you have trouble sitting upright, you can sit on the edge of a blanket, but also keep a second blanket or a towel nearby. Bend your right knee and bring your right leg over and across your left leg. Use your hand to draw your right foot close to your outer left hip. Move your left foot across the midline to the right. Using your hands on the floor, lift and wiggle your hips until your knees are stacked, with your right knee above your left.”

King Pigeon Hip Stretch

“Raja kapotasana (king pigeon pose) is the strongest of the piriformis stretches. Bring yourself only to the edge of the stretch, so that you can remain there, breathe, and allow the piriformis to release. Start on your hands and knees. Bring your right knee forward and out to the right. Bring your right foot forward as well, until your heel is in line with your left hip and your shin is at about a 45-degree angle. Keep your foot flexed to protect your knee. To stretch the right piriformis, lean your upper body forward, tuck your left toes under, and slide or walk your left leg straight back, allowing your right thigh to rotate out passively as your hip descends toward the floor. Keep your hips level to the floor and square to the front of the mat; don’t let your pelvis turn or fall to one side. Support your right hip with a blanket if it does not reach the floor, and remain in the pose for anywhere from several breaths to a minute. Experiment with leaning your upper body forward over your shin, and with bringing your torso more upright to vary the stretch to the hip.”

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10 Weird-Looking Yoga Poses

Weird-Looking Yoga Poses  

  “Yoga and its practice is all sorts of wonderful and awesome, but we have to admit that there are some poses that if you didn’t understand or practice yoga, would look either painful, funny, or just plain weird. Here are some weird-looking yoga poses that get our vote.”
Eight Angle Pose (a.k.a. Astavakrasana)

  

“While we think this is one of the most fantastic arm balances you can do, you have to admit it also kind of looks like an “evil push-up” a fitness instructor would come up with to make your life harder.”

Happy Baby Pose (a.k.a. Ananda Balasana)

  

“Okay, we don’t have to say much on this because it’s pretty clear even just from “Happy Baby” why this pose looks funny. If you ask us though, it really does look happy and just plain relaxing!”

Ear Pressure Pose (a.k.a Karnapidasana)

  

“It’s the delicious back stretch with your butt in the air that (almost) always gets voted as a funny-looking yoga pose. Why? Because if not for yoga, why would anyone even get in this position?!”

Goddess Pose (a.k.a. Utkata Konasana)

  

“A great hip opener that can easily be made theatrical by adding or doing jazz hands.”

Embryo Pose (a.k.a. Pindasana)

  

“Personally, I find this pose relaxing because it forces me to focus on my breathing. However, I also remember my sister walking in on me holding this pose and the only thing she said was: “what the f*ck are you doing?!?!” So yeah….I guess it DOES look weird?”

Bound Lotus (a.k.a Baddha Padmasana)

  

“Don’t you hate it when you’re meditating in Lotus and your big toes start itching like crazy? Better get into Baddha Padmasana and scratch ‘em – said no one ever.”

Shoulder Pressing Pose (a.k.a. Bhujapida

  

“Another arm balancing pose that without the yoga perspective, kind of makes us look like frogs suspended in mid-air.”

Firefly Pose (a.k.a. Tittibhasana)

  

“Okay, first of all, we recognize that this takes mad skills to perform (as with most of the other poses on this list, really). That said, it’s not that hard to imagine if everyone held Firefly and walked with their hands. Maybe a step up from crab walk?”

Legs Behind the Head Pose (a.k.a. Dwi Pada Sirsasana)

  

“Because it’s perfectly normal and commonplace to put your legs behind your head while you eat a cupcake.”

Yogic Sleep/Sleeping Yogi Pose (a.k.a. Yoga Nidrasana)

  

“Yogi Krista looks so serene in this picture that we almost forget she’s folded her body into a size that would fit into a luggage. Okay so maybe this one doesn’t count as funny or weird, but it’s definitely jaw-dropping and WTF-inducing!”

“Now yoga is clearly not about being able to transform into gravity-defying human pretzels…but man, these poses sure make us want to reach that level of practice — no matter how funny or weird we’ll look to everyone else.”

HOW TO: Warrior II Pose (Virabhadrasana II)

groundedrootsyoga

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The second of the three Warrior Poses, this one is perfect for toning the legs, glutes, and core and will also help improve balance and focus.  Check out Warrior I Pose, and use these two foundational standing poses in sequence with one another as part of your daily yoga practice.

Instructions:
Begin in Mountain Pose at the top of your mat.

Step your right foot back behind you about 3 1/2 feet and turn your toes out 90 degrees.

Bend the left leg and keep the left knee directly over the ankle or slightly behind.

Ensure that your hips are facing the right, long edge of your mat and align your left heel with the arch of your right foot.

Reach both arms out on either side at shoulder height, bringing them in a straight line.

Turn your head and gaze out over your left middle finger.

Tuck your…

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How Yoga Can Help You Become a Better Dancer

Petite Girls Guide

Yoga for dancing

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“All dancers are ultimately on the same quest: to become better, stronger dancers. But in order to reach beyond their limits, many dancers find they need additional training methods besides dance, and yoga is a popular choice.”

“But why?”

“Why is yoga one tool no dancer’s survival kit should be without?”

“Increased body awareness.”

“While all dance classes focus on position and alignment, yoga classes take this one step further. The slower pace of a yoga class naturally allows for greater precision. For example, instead of just putting your feet into a parallel position, you have time to check that the outside edges of your feet line up the with the outside edges of your mat, your weight is equally distributed to all four corners of your feet, your toes are spread wide and your pinky toes are anchored firmly into the floor.”

“By taking the time…

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Wellness Ayurveda

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WELLNESS AYURVEDA
Betel leaf – Golden heart of nature.

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“Have you ever thought whether nature has a heart? If yes, then here’s your answer. The heart shaped Betel leaf is beckoned as the ‘Golden heart of nature’. Dating back to 7000 BC, Betel is one among those oldest divine herbs bestowed on mankind. Besides numerous health benefits, these appealing leaves are a symbol of status and hospitality for greeting Kings, nobles and guests in the cultural heritage of India. Botanically called as Piper betle, Betel vine is a member of the pepper family Piperaceae. It’s an evergreen and perennial creeper.”

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“Significance of leaves has been explained in relationship to every sphere of human life including social, culture, religious and is very much relevant even in modern days. The plant, by itself, is said to have originated in India. Betel Leaf is cultivated in majority of South and Southeast Asia, and is a much esteemed leaf across the dozen nations. In India, the leaf is considered auspicious and is used as an auspicious exchange material not only during ceremonies, but also when fixing deals, business transactions and even marriage alliances.”

“The betel plant is called nagvalli in Sanskrit language meaning serpentine growth. The betel plant is a slender creeper which has alternate, heart shaped, smooth, lustrous dark green leaves with pointed apex. Leaves are edible part of plant which is bitter in taste but aromatic. Betel leaves are not famous in the western world because western food habits are much different than that of eastern. In India and few other Asian countries it is common practice to eat masala pan (betel leaves stuffed with sliced betel nut and other spices) after food.”

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History:
In these ancient texts Betel leaves were referred as Tambulika, Tambuladhikara, Tambuladayini, and Tambuladyaka and so on. Ayurvedic encyclopedias like Charaka Samhita and Sushruta Samhita have also indicated the many uses of Betel leaves.The primeval Ayurvedic texts also highlight the aphrodisiac properties of Betel leaf that aid in treating male and female reproductive problems.”

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“The Chinese Traditional medicine also used Betel leaves for its warm and spicy nature that aided in the treatment of cough, itching, inflammation, headache and respiratory infections. Betel leaves were used in various medical preparations of the Unani medicine and was used as a brain tonic, and in treating throat infections, cleansing the blood and for enhancing the appetite.Toward the 13th century, European traveler Marco Polo recorded betel chewing among kings and nobles in India.”

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“According to the study of numerous Anthropologists, the traces of Betel leaves were said have been found in spirit caves of Northwest Thailand, which dates back to 5500 to 7000 B.C. The oldest historical book of Sri Lanka, ‘Mahawamsa’ written in Pali talks about the leaves of the Betel vine. There are certain other findings in human skeletons dating back to 3000 BC in countries like Philippines and Indonesia, indicating the use of Betel leaves even before thousands of years.”

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“Betel is a native of central and eastern Malaysia. It spread at a very early date throughout tropical Asia and later to Madagascar and East Africa. In India, it is widely cultivated in Tamil Nadu, Madhya Pradesh, West Bengal, Orissa, Maharashtra and Uttar Pradesh. Offering betel morsel to guests in Indian subcontinent is a common courtesy. Recent studies have shown that betel leaves contain tannins, sugar and diastases and an essential oil. The essential oil is a light yellow liquid of aromatic odor and sharp burning in taste. It contains a phenol called chavicol which has powerful antiseptic properties.”

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“The traditional practice of chewing Betel leaves with areca nut has been mentioned in the pre-historic books of the Indian mythology and the most predominant among them are Raghuvamsa written by Kalidas and Kamsutra written by Vatsyayana. In one of the oldest text named Sakta-tantra, Betel leaves have been denoted as one of the important ways of attaining siddhi or abundant blessings from the Almighty.”

“Betel leaves were also used in the traditional healing system for treating various health disorders like conjunctivitis, leucorrhea, rheumatism, ringworm, constipation, infertility, bad breath, ottorrhoea, cough and asthma. Singers chewed these leaves to enhance their voice.There is archaeological evidence that the betel leaves have been chewed along with the areca nut since very ancient times.”

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