Bipolar and Mental Illnesses are written about here. Written by a bipolar person themselves.

Posts tagged ‘black’

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Black Light Jell-o

Black Light Jell-o


“So why does the Jello glow? Quinine (an ingredient in tonic water) is a fluorescent substance. These substances absorb ultraviolet light and then re-emit it. The light emitted has a longer wavelength than the one absorbed which makes the light visible and causes quinine to glow. When you substitute tonic water for regular tap water when making the Jello, it adds the quinine which adds the glow. It is better to use light-colored Jello for maximum glow.”


Step 1:

You will need the following:

  • *Jello (light-colored Jello such as Lemon or Lime will work best for this project)
  • *16oz of tonic water
  • *Stove
  • *Liquid measuring cup
  • *Small pot for boiling water
  • *Mixing bowl
  • *Mixing spoon
  • *Refrigerator
  • *Small Table Lamp with fluorescent blacklight (The blacklight must be fluorescent and not simply a colored bulb. It can be purchased at most Wal-Mart locations for around $4.00)

STEP 2: MEASURE OUT TONIC WATER

  • Measure out 8oz (1 cup) of tonic water in a liquid measuring cup.

STEP 3: POUR TONIC WATER INTO POT

  • Pour tonic water into pot.

STEP 4: TURN STOVE BURNER ON HIGH

  • Put pot on burner and turn on high.

STEP 5: POUR JELLO PACKET INTO MIXING BOWL

  • While water is boiling, pour Jello packet into mixing bowl.

STEP 6: POUR BOILING WATER INTO MIXING BOWL

  • Once water has boiled, pour the boiling tonic water into mixing bowl.

STEP 7: STIR UNTIL DISSOLVED

  • Stir together Jello and boiling tonic water, making sure that the Jello powder fully dissolves.

STEP 8: ADD COLD WATER

  • Add one cup of cold tap water to the mixing bowl.
  • Alternate method: If you would like your Jello to glow more brightly, add one cup of cold tonic water instead of tap water. However, doing this will make the Jello taste more bitter than normal.

STEP 9: CHILL IN FRIDGE

  • Place the mixing bowl in the fridge and chill for four hours.

STEP 10: REMOVE AND TEST WITH BLACKLIGHT

Source: Black Light Jello

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Look of the Week – February 6th

Look of the Week – Black Chokers


Choker of all colors and styles are trending and will continue to throughout the year. I wanted the look of the Week to be about black chokers, and not all chokers. There are too many different styles, colors, materials and more to go through and pick just one, because they’re all amazing, so I’m sticking with black. I see that majority of chokers sold are black. Chokers are so affordable too. They can range from $2-$30 on average. I hope you are inspired to try out a choker, and those of you from the 90’s, if you are done with chokers, I completely understand. But if you are one of those girls or guys from the age when chokers were from, please leave me a comment telling me how you feel about the trend being back and everywhere? 

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Look of the Week: Cont. – Celebs in Faux Leather Pants

Look of the Week: Cont. – Celebs in Faux Leather Pants

As you can see, my Look of the Week – Black Faux Leather Pants has everyone wearing them! Especially celebrities. You can see Kim Kardashian, Nicole Kidman, Kristen Cavaleri, Beyoncé and Kylie Jenner for example. They all rock this hot, sexy trend that goes with everything, trust me! You can wear this look all winter/spring long. 








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Look of the Week – January 30th

Look of the Week – Black Faux/Leather Pants


It doesn’t matter to me if you like real versus faux, when it comes to your leather pants. But you have got to get yourself a pair of them now. I wear faux leather and it is so comfortable to wear, and it also keeps me warm and insulated. I am a ver naturally cold person, but when I wear my faux leather pants, I feel so much better, and am happier, just from the pants making me warm. The black, tight leather look is slimming on your body. You can’t deny that. Everyone looks great in a pair, and the stretchier the better, in my book that is. I hope you like these pictures of people wearing both real and faux leather pants. Majority are faux. Can you spot the real ones? There’s only a few. 


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Why don’t white people believe people of color about racism? — Of Means and Ends

After the tragic police shootings of Terence Crutcher and Keith Lamont Scott, some white people fell into a typical offensive behavior pattern. Despite damning video evidence, they want to know more about the story. They insist that if black people only behaved a certain way, and taught their children to do the same, they wouldn’t […]

via Why don’t white people believe people of color about racism? — Of Means and Ends

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Why Police Shootings are State-Sanctioned Violence — TheReporterandTheGirlMINUSTheSuperMan!

What is the rationale that an “armed and dangerous” ISIS-inspired terrorist gets to live, see his family, and do all the things that a law-abiding father of four will never get to do? For the record, I am glad that Ahmad Rahami received treatment and was treated with dignity as each human deserves. But why weren’t any of these men too?

via Why Police Shootings are State-Sanctioned Violence — TheReporterandTheGirlMINUSTheSuperMan!

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The Black Corset

  
“The corset has been an important article of clothing for several centuries, evolving as fashion trends have changed. Women, as well as some men, have used it to change the appearance of their bodies.”

  
“The corset first became popular in sixteenth-century Europe, reaching the zenith of its popularity in the Victorian era. The earliest image of a possible corset was made ca. 2000 BC. The image is of a Cretan woman, and the article of clothing depicted might be perceived as a corset; however, it is worn as an outer-garment. While the corset has typically been worn as an undergarment, it has occasionally been used as an outer-garment; corsets as outer-garments can be seen in the national dress of many European countries.”

  
“The term “corset” is attested from 1300, coming from the French “corset” which meant “a kind of laced bodice.” The term “stays” was frequently used in English from c. 1600 until the early twentieth century.”

  
But there’s something about the black corset. Something so special and sexy about it. The corset has been a staple to women’s closets for centuries. They have come in every shape, color, pattern, and design imaginable. 

The dictionary defines black as “lacking hue and brightness; absorbing light without reflecting any of the rays composing it.” But black means a lot more than just that to different people.

The color black relates to the hidden, the secretive and the unknown, and as a result it creates an air of mystery. It keeps things bottled up inside, hidden from the world.

  
In color psychology this color gives protection from external emotional stress.

It creates a barrier between itself and the outside world, providing comfort while protecting its emotions and feelings, and hiding its vulnerabilities, insecurities and lack of self confidence.

Black is the absorption of all color and the absence of light.

Black hides, while white brings to light.

What black covers, white uncovers.

  
We all use black at various times to hide from the world around us in one way or another. Some of us use it to hide our weight; others among us use it to hide our feelings, our fears or our insecurities

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