Bipolar and Mental Illnesses are written about here. Written by a bipolar person themselves.

Posts tagged ‘depression’

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Food for Depression

Food for Depression 



It is January, and now officially winter everywhere. Since I live in Florida, our cold is just arriving for its short while. During the winter months people are much more likely to become depressed. People can become depressed from the cold weather, the cloudy skies, staying warm with layers of clothes, your monotonous job. There are endless reasons why someone could get down and feel a little depressed. The good news is, there are so many ways to fight depression with food, eating the right kind. Here are two examples of foods to eat to feel less sad and lessen depression. 


If you are in need of a pick-me-up, or a mood booster, here are foods for a brighter mood. Boosting your mood can elavate you to another level. They can turn that frown upside down… if you let them. 


What is it in our bodies that keep us happy? Do you know? This chart shows what you need to eat to keep a happy brain. 


In our brains we have 4 chemicals that keep us regulated and happy. Without them, even having one low can cause you to feel fatigue and create anxiety, up to depression. So learn these four chemicals and feed your brain. 





Along side depression is stress and anxiety. There are so many foods that can help you ease your stress, and lessen anxiety. I have struggled with anxiety for over a decade now, and I have come to learn that I act nicer and feel happier when I have these foods in my body. 



So stay healthy and happy this winter season. Eat the right foods, supplements and vitamins, whatever it calls for to keep a happy brain, and help stay away from depression. Along with alleviating depression. 

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Essential Oils for Autism

Essential Oils for Autism

 “More and more we are hearing about essential oils and the benefits of using them. Some time ago, I remember reading a thread in a private autism parents group. The gist was divided; half were for essential oils, half thought it was just another waste of time. Some parents even had the misconception that people were touting essential oils can “cure” autism.”

Source: autismparentingmagazine.com




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Hurricane FACTS 

Hurricane Facts: 

WHAT IS A HURRICANE?

A hurricane is a type of storm called a tropical cyclone, which forms over tropical or subtropical waters.


“Hurricanes are large, swirling storms. They produce winds of 119 kilometers per hour (74 mph) or higher. That’s faster than a cheetah, the fastest animal on land. Winds from a hurricane can damage buildings and trees.”


“Hurricanes form over warm ocean waters. Sometimes they strike land. When a hurricane reaches land, it pushes a wall of ocean water ashore. This wall of water is called a storm surge. Heavy rain and storm surge from a hurricane can cause flooding.”

“Once a hurricane forms, weather forecasters predict its path. They also predict how strong it will get. This information helps people get ready for the storm.”


“There are five types, or categories, of hurricanes. The scale of categories is called the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. The categories are based on wind speed.”


Category 1: Winds 119-153 km/hr (74-95 mph) – faster than a cheetah

Category 2: Winds 154-177 km/hr (96-110 mph) – as fast or faster than a baseball pitcher’s fastball

Category 3: Winds 178-208 km/hr (111-129 mph) – similar, or close, to the serving speed of many professional tennis players

Category 4: Winds 209-251 km/hr (130-156 mph) – faster than the world’s fastest rollercoaster

Category 5: Winds more than 252 km/hr (157 mph) – similar, or close, to the speed of some high-speed trains

Source: nasa.gov
Only five times in US history have there been category five hurricane hit the US. 1932, 1933, 1961, 2005, and 2007. Only in 2005 have more than two category five hurricanes formed. 

  • Hurricane Names:

When the the winds from these storms reach 39 mph (34 kts), the cyclones are given names. Years ago, an international committee developed names for Atlantic cyclones (The History of Naming Hurricanes). In 1979 a six year rotating list of Atlantic storm names was adopted — alternating between male and female hurricane names. Storm names are used to facilitate geographic referencing, for warning services, for legal issues, and to reduce confusion when two or more tropical cyclones occur at the same time. Through a vote of the World Meteorological Organization Region IV Subcommittee, Atlantic cyclone names are retired usually when hurricanes result in substantial damage or death or for other special circumstances.

  • Looking back on some of the worst hurricanes:

Hurricane Andrew:



Hurricane Katrina:




Hurricane Frances:



Hurricane Ivan:



Hurricane Charley:




Hurricane Jeanne:




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Yoga for Depression & Anxiety

Yoga for Depression & Anxiety


I have struggled with different amounts of anxiety and depression many times during my life. I was first diagnosed with depression at 17, and I don’t remember having very much anxiety back then. Now that I have been diagnosed with bipolar for close to a decade now, I have noticed throughout the years different levels of anxiety too. I used to get a lot of anxiety from large crowds and social settings. But once I got on the right medications, the anxiety went away. But, after I was diagnosed with being bipolar, I was also diagnosed with having ADHD. I was in very much in need of medication for my ADHD. I first began with Adderall, and if I took a pill without eating, forget it! I had so much anxiety I had to take 1-2 1mg Klonopin to combat the shaking and heavy breathing. A few years go by, and I am fully integrated with my Adderall and it doesn’t give me much anxiety anymore. 


Throughout the past 10 years, since being diagnosed Bipolar, I began practicing yoga. I have been doing yoga for over six years now, and it makes me feel so much better then any medication can make me feel. My background is in dance and cheerleading, so when I began yoga I was automatically good at an intermediate level going on advanced. For a few years, I even wanted to become a yoga instructor. But my shoulder had problems from tumbling in gymnastics, so I couldn’t pursue that career. But the yoga I did made me feel so incredible after every session. I loved the high after it was all done. It can be a very euphoric experience if and/or when you understand the breath, and breathing through motions. I think everyone should try yoga, especially those suffering with depression and anxiety. Yoga has stopped my anxiety due to all of the breathing you do during a series. Yoga brings me back to my normal state of mind and even a relaxed state.





*Essential Oils are always a good idea to use to help the stress go away! Tip- USE A DIFFUSER WHILE DOING YOUR YOGA


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New Seasons can Affect Bipolar Disorder 

New Seasons Affect Bipolar Disorder 


I know that I am definitely one of the millions of people who suffer each season with Seasonal Affective Disorder. It’s part of the bipolar disorder. It has to do with our circadian rhythm’s, and how we get depressed from not enough daylight. 

Do you ever feel depressed for no reason during fall and winter months? Did you know that the amount of sun we receive each day does have an affect on our bodies happiness. And those who suffer from a mental illness are much more likely to feel or get depressed. When the sun is out less and less, more darkness is what we observe. So remember to get as much sun as possible by opening blinds, curtains, and letting in light. As well as, going outside more will help with not feeling as depressed. 

Sourceeverydayhealth.com

*Seasonal Affective Disorder Versus Seasonal Bipolar Disorder


“Doctors have long distinguished between seasonal depression and seasonal bipolar disorder. Seasonal depression — commonly referred to as SAD, for seasonal affective disorder — is a mood disorder brought on by the biological effects of a lack of sunlight. Typically experienced in the late fall and winter, it is particularly prevalent in northern regions, according to the American Psychological Association (APA). What distinguishes seasonal bipolar disorder from SAD is the presence of a manic episode within a given period of time.”



“People must have a history of manic or hypomanic episodes (the extreme highs) to be diagnosed with a bipolar mood disorder, explains Ken Duckworth, MD, medical director for the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) and an assistant professor at the Harvard University Medical School. If that’s not part of their medical history, he says, then their seasonal winter response is a depressive disorder and not bipolar.”



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Psychotic Experiences Linked to Cognitive Changes


Psychotic Experiences Linked to Cognitive Changes

From: Psychcentral.com



“Recent research suggests that people who have psychotic experiences, but no diagnosis of psychotic illness, have altered cognitive functioning compared with people without psychotic experiences.”

“A substantial minority of the general population, around six percent, experiences subclinical psychotic experiences, report MSc student Josephine Mollon of King’s College London, UK, and colleagues in the journal JAMA Psychiatry.”

“Both disorders share risk factors such as low IQ, childhood maltreatment, and stressful life events, as well as similar brain scan results such as deficits in grey and white matter.”

“The researchers looked at neuropsychological functioning and psychotic experiences in adults, taking into account sociodemographic characteristics and age. They used information gathered from household surveys covering 1,677 people aged 16 years or older, living in two areas of London, UK. Average age was 40 years.”
“Participants’ psychotic experiences were measured using the Psychosis Screening Questionnaire, which is administered by an interviewer. It assesses psychotic experiences in the previous year, covering thought disorder, paranoia, strange experiences, and hallucinations. The tool also covers hypomania, a mild form of mania, marked by elation and hyperactivity, but this was not assessed as the focus was on psychosis.”

“Cognitive functioning was measured with a series of tests looking at verbal knowledge (using a reading test), working memory, general memory, and cognitive processing speed. From this, an overall IQ score was calculated.”
“One in ten of the participants had previously had psychotic experiences. This group was not significantly different from those without psychotic experiences on overall IQ or processing speed. But they scored less highly on verbal knowledge, working memory, and general memory.”

“Medium to large impairments in cognitive functioning were seen among participants aged 50 years and older with psychotic experiences. These differences remained once socioeconomic status, cannabis use, and common mental disorders were taken into account.”

“The team writes, “The profile of cognitive impairment in adults with psychotic experiences differed from that seen in adults with psychotic disorders, suggesting important differences between subclinical and clinical psychosis.””

6-Year Delay from Initial Diagnoses of Bipolar, to Final Diagnoses. 




“A new international study discovers it takes almost six years following symptoms of bipolar disorder and determination of diagnosis and initiation of treatment.”
“Many experts believe crucial opportunities to manage bipolar disorder early are being lost because of the delay.”

                                       –psychcentral.com


“Investigators performed a meta-analysis of 9,415 patients from 27 studies, the largest of its kind.”

“They discovered many patients experience distressing and disruptive symptoms for several years until receiving proper treatment for bipolar disorder, previously known as manic-depressive illness.”


“According to lead researcher Dr. Matthew Large, a psychiatrist at Prince of Wales Hospital, the delay is often longer for young people because moodiness is sometimes misperceived by parents.”


“This is common as providers may attribute symptoms as the ups and downs of the teenage years rather than the emergence of bipolar disorder. The misdiagnosis is disturbing as bipolar can be effectively treated with mood stabilizing medication.”


“This is a lost opportunity because the severity and frequency of episodes can be reduced with medication and other interventions,” Large said. “While some patients, particularly those who present with psychosis, probably do receive timely treatment, the diagnosis of the early phase of bipolar disorder can be difficult.”

“This is because mental health clinicians are sometimes unable to distinguish the depressed phase of bipolar disorder from other types of depression.”


To learn more about this, please read the whole article. I have taken the best of it to show to you, but the article will tell you so much more.

Go to:  Delay in Bipolar Diagnosis Scary

And don’t forget to spread that AWARENESS IS KEY.  That is my motto on this blog

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