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Talk About the Moon

Talk About the Moon

The is always moving, like us, and it makes certain dates on the calendar spectacular to watch! This post is filled with awesome explanations about the Moon’s many phases and special dates, like, full moon’s. I did not write the in-depth material, because that is not my field. So I filled it with lots of information for you to learn about Full Moon’s, Lunar Phases and the Moon’s 8 Phases. 


  • What is a Lunar Phase? 

“The lunar phase or phase of the moon is the shape of the illuminated (sunlit) portion of the Moon as seen by an observer on Earth. The lunar phases change cyclically as the Moon orbits the Earth, according to the changing positions of the Moon and Sun relative to the Earth. The Moon’s rotation is tidally locked by the Earth’s gravity, therefore the same lunar surface always faces Earth. This face is variously sunlit depending on the position of the Moon in its orbit. Therefore, the portion of this hemisphere that is visible to an observer on Earth can vary from about 100% (full moon) to 0% (new moon). The lunar terminator is the boundary between the illuminated and darkened hemispheres. Each of the four “intermediate” lunar phases (see below) is roughly seven days (~7.4 days) but this varies slightly due to the elliptical shape of the Moon’s orbit. Aside from some craters near the lunar poles such as Shoemaker, all parts of the Moon see around 14.77 days of sunlight, followed by 14.77 days of “night”. (The side of the Moon facing away from the Earth is sometimes called the “dark side”, which is a misnomer.”

Source: Lunar Phases

  • Did you know the Moon has 8 Phases? 

  • Moon’s 8 Phases

“Phase 1 New Moon – The side of the moon that is facing the Earth is not lit up by the sun. At this time the moon is not visible.

 Phase 2Waxing Crescent – A small part (less than 1/2) of the moon is lit up at this point. The part that is lit up is slowly getting bigger.

Phase 3First Quarter – One half of the moon is lit up by the sun at this point. The part that is lit up is slowly getting bigger.

Phase 4Waxing Gibbous – At this time half of the moon is lit up. The part that is lit is slowly getting bigger. Waxing means to slowly get bigger.

Phase 5Full Moon – The side of the moon that is lit up by the sun is facing the Earth. The entire moon is lit up at this point.

Phase 6Waning Gibbous – The moon is not quite lit up all the way by sunlight. The part of the moon this is lit is slowly getting smaller. Waning means to slowly get smaller.

Phase 7Last Quarter – Half of the moon is lit up but the sun. The part that we can see lit up is slowly getting smaller.

Phase 8Waning Crescent – A small part of the moon is lit up at this point. It is getting smaller by the minute.”

Source: Moon’s 8 Phases

  • Here is what the phases actually look like:


“The average calendar month, which is  1⁄12 of a tropical year, is about 30.44 days, while the Moon’s phase (synodic) cycle repeats on average every 29.53 days. Therefore, the timing of the Moon’s phases shifts by an average of almost one day for each successive month. (Lunar year=354 days.)”


“Photographing the Moon’s phase every day for a month, starting in the evening after sunset, and repeating approximately fifty minutes later each successive day, ending in the morning before sunrise, would create a composite image like the example calendar from May 8, 2005, to June 6, 2005 here in the left. There is no picture on May 20 since a picture would be taken before midnight on May 19, and after midnight on May 21. Similarly, on a calendar listing moon rise or set times, some days will appear to be skipped. When the Moon rises just before midnight one night it will rise just after midnight the next (so too with setting). The ‘skipped day’ is just a feature of the moon’s eastward movement in relation to the sun, which at most latitudes causes the moon to rise later each day. The moon has a predictable orbit every month.”

  • Here is the Moon, moving through phases quite swiftly

  • Here are some misconceptions about the Moon: 

“It might be expected that once every month, when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun during a new moon, its shadow would fall on Earth causing a solar eclipse, but this does not happen every month. Nor is it true that during every full moon, the Earth’s shadow falls on the Moon, causing a lunar eclipse. Solar and lunar eclipses are not observed every month because the plane of the Moon’s orbit around the Earth is tilted by about five degrees with respect to the plane of Earth’s orbit around the Sun (the plane of the ecliptic). Thus, when new and full moons occur, the Moon usually lies to the north or south of a direct line through the Earth and Sun. Although an eclipse can only occur when the Moon is either new (solar) or full (lunar), it must also be positioned very near the intersection of Earth’s orbit plane about the Sun and the Moon’s orbit plane about the Earth (that is, at one of its nodes). This happens about twice per year, and so there are between four and seven eclipses in a calendar year. Most of these events are quite insignificant; major eclipses of the Moon or Sun are less frequent.”

Source: Lunar Phases

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Full “Hunters” Moon Tonight – October 15th

Full “Hunters” Moon Tonight – October 15th


“What makes a Hunter’s Moon special? Nature is particularly cooperative around the time of the autumn equinox to make the fall full moonrises unique.”


“Here’s what happens. On average, the moon rises about 50 minutes later each day. But when a full moon happens close to the autumnal equinox – either a Harvest or a Hunter’s Moon – the moon (at mid-temperate latitudes) rises only about 30 to 35 minutes later daily for several days before and after the full moon. The reason is that the ecliptic – or the moon’s orbital path – makes a narrow angle with the evening horizon around the time of the autumn equinox.”


“The result is that there’s a shorter-than-usual lag time between successive moonrises around the full Hunter’s Moon.”

“These early evening moonrises are what make every Hunter’s Moon special. Every full moon rises around sunset. After the full Hunter’s Moon, you’ll see the moon ascending in the east relatively soon after sunset for a few days in a row at northerly latitudes.”


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October’s Full Hunter’s Moon (and Supermoon?) Rises This Weekend

October’s Full Hunter’s Moon (and Supermoon?) Rises This Weekend



“The full Hunter’s Moon of October will rise in the early hours of Sunday morning (Oct. 16) — and by some definitions, it’s also a “supermoon.””



“October’s full Hunter’s Moon follows the full Harvest Moon of September, which falls around the start of the autumn equinox. The moniker Hunter’s Moon was coined in the Northern Hemisphere, and refers to the time of year when deer and other game are fattened, and hunters begin stocking up for the winter months ahead.”


“This month, the full moon of October will peak on Sunday at 12:23 a.m. EDT (0423 GMT). However, to the casual skywatcher, it will also appear full in the night sky a day prior and after it reaches peak fullness.”


“A full moon occurs each month when the sun, Earth and moon line up, with the moon on the opposite side of the Earth to the sun. At this time, the Earth-facing side of the moon is completely lit up by sunlight. A lunar eclipse occurs when the three bodies are lined up such that the moon passes through the shadow of the Earth. Typically, the moon is not completely darkened by the shadow, but instead turns a deep shade of red.”


“October’s full moon will also take place when the moon is at its closest point to Earth in its 27-day lunar orbit (this point is known as perigee). Some people define a full moon at perigee as a supermoon. The supermoon is not a scientific term, however, so there are varying definitions. The Slooh Community Observatory uses the term supermoon only once per year, to refer to the full moon that comes closest to Earth in its orbit, a Slooh representative told Space.com. (In addition, Slooh uses the term “mega moon” instead of supermoon.)”

“In collaboration with The Old Farmer’s Almanac, Slooh will offer a live broadcast for this month’s full moon on Saturday (Oct. 15). You can also watch it live on Space.com, courtesy of Slooh. The broadcast will share facts and history about the full Hunter’s Moon, as well as an interview with Slooh Astronomer Bob Berman, who will discuss the difference between a full moon and a supermoon.”


“October’s full moon has also been assigned a few other names, in addition to Hunter’s Moon. The Old Farmer’s Almanac, for example, also refers to it as the Travel Moon and the Dying Grass Moon, as farmers traditionally harvest their fields in late September or early October.”

“Since the full moon of October falls mid-month, October’s new moon (when no sunlight falls on the Earth-facing side) will rise Oct. 30, just in time for Halloween.”


Source: amp.space.com


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8 Ways The Full Moon In Pisces Can Help You Find Inner Peace

  

Full Moon in Pisces

The full moon may have been last night- but it will be affecting you for a while….
“Ready, set, release. The Pisces full moon awakens our desire for closure on a deep soul level. As the zodiac’s last sign, Pisces is about endings and transitions. It’s time to surrender, wave the white flag, and accept the things we cannot change.”

  

“Yeah, we’re quoting the Serenity Prayer, because recovery is part of the Pisces realm. As human beings, we’re addicted to control. We manage our weight, our partners, our money — whatever we can get our hot little hands on. Yet, the more we try to manipulate the world around us, the crazier we feel! Seriously. What’s scarier than a calorie-counter who hasn’t eaten a solid meal for days, or a person consumed by jealousy and fear in a relationship? Tunnel vision makes us mad men and women.”

  

“The Pisces full moon arrives in perfect timing, offering a one-way ticket outta our self-constructed Crazytowns. Since full moons are like giant celestial spotlights, this one could beam into an area of life where you’ve been stuck or in denial. If you’ve ignored your intuition, your appetite, and your creative expression, the Pisces full moon reminds you to pay attention. Pisces is also a dual sign, which means we will experience some of life’s paradoxes.”

  

  
Click on the link at the top of the page to read it in its entirety. 

‘Fuller House’: John Stamos Shares First Pic Of Original Cast Back Together On Set

Hollywood Life

Have mercy! We nearly cried after seeing this new pic of the ‘Full House’ cast back together on the set of the series’ Netflix spinoff, ‘Fuller House.’ It honestly feels like no time has passed — we already started singing the theme song. ‘Whatever happened to predictability…’

“The milkman, the paperboy, evening TV?” Excuse us — we’re in a Fuller House frenzy over here, especially after seeing this new pic of the Full House cast back together on the set of their new Netflix spinoff. We’re not joking. This photo gave us the feels.

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