Bipolar and Mental Illnesses are written about here. Written by a bipolar person themselves.

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Noopept and its Benefits 

Noopept and its Benefits

“Noopept is the brand name for N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester, a Nootropic molecule similar to Piracetam. Noopept may alleviate cognitive decline.”

“Noopept is the brand name for N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester , a synthetic nootropic molecule.”

“Noopept has a similar effect to piracetam, in that it provides a mild cognitive boost after supplementation. Noopept also provides a subtle psychostimulatory effect.”

The other week, my husband bought the Noopept you see above, and told me that I should start taking it to help with my memory. He told me how it can help reverse memory loss and help with cognition. So far, I’ve been taking it for about 10 days and I can already sense that something has happened, or is happening to my memory. I have been able to recall certain memories with a much clearer view, so to say. It’s very hard to explain. I feel like I can reach certain memories in my head, but not all of them like the way I can, now that I’ve been using Noopept. I certainly recommend it for anyone at any age. Don’t wait till it’s too late to reverse damage. Help your brain today. 

“Noopept is one of the strongest nootropics available on the market today. It provides a boost to overall cognition and has a slight psychostimulatory effect. Contrary to most nootropics, Noopept’s effects start within mere minutes of ingestion making it an excellent choice right before mentally demanding tasks.”

“Noopept is a nootropic supplement that’s been getting a lot of attention lately. It has close ties to the popular racetam family of nootropics that are known for their benefits on cognitive ability as well their neuroprotective properties. What makes Noopept a unique nootropic in your toolbox is that its effects are felt almost immediately after ingestion.”

“Many nootropics can take days, weeks, or even months, for their full effects to kick in but Noopept is another story. Another nootropic that compares to Noopept’s immediate effects is phenylpiracetam.”

“Currently, Noopept is being prescribed and distributed in Russia and its surrounding countries for its nootropic properties. Its popularity has drastically increased and is now distributed worldwide.”

“Noopept as a nootropic is commonly compared to piracetam and aniracetam. It works via a similar mechanism as piracetam but is estimated to be 1,000 to 5,000 times more potent. This doesn’t imply that its effect is more profound, it just attunes itself better to the brain’s receptors. As a result, Noopept can be taken in relatively smaller doses to produce similar effects as that of Piracetam.”

What are benefits of taking Noopept? 

•Memory and Learning

“Noopept’s most emphasized benefit is how it can enhance memory and improve the learning process. Noopept, like Piracetam, assists with memory formation, but with additional benefits not present in the latter, which are memory consolidation and memory retrieval. Noopept facilitates the proper management of all forms of stimuli as they are processed by the brain, which allows for better memory retrieval. In other words, signals being processed by our senses are more streamlined as they are transported into our brains in the form of memory.”

“Through the continued use of Noopept, you will notice that you can digest more information and process it more readily for use in your daily activities. You might even recall names, places, maybe a word spoken in a chance encounter, a song title that you thought you had forgotten before, and so on. Memory lapses will be a thing of the past, or at least kept to a minimum.”


•Neuroprotective Properties

“Studies show that Noopept has high neuroprotective properties. The stimulation of the neurons caused by the health supplement prevents oxidative damage and apoptosis in the human brain. Many patients dealing with cognitive impairment regularly can benefit from a regular dosage of Noopept to prevent further dissociative cognitive functions.”


•Increased levels of NGF

“NGF (Nerve Growth Factor) is a unique protein in the body that is involved in the growth, maintenance, and survival of nerve cells, including brain cells. NGF is also considered to be a key player in neurogenesis, your body’s ability to create new cells.”


“By increasing NGF levels in the brain, we support the mechanisms involved in neurogenesis which improves the performance of neural networks within the brain, allowing for new neural connections. The result means potentially improved mental abilities in virtually all areas of cognition.”




•Increased levels of BDNF

“BDNF (Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor) is another protein in the body that has a similar role to the NGF mentioned above. BDNF is considered one of the most important molecules involved in memory, playing a vital role in both short-term and long-term memory formation.”

•Improves Associations between Brain Hemispheres

“Both the right and left hemispheres of the brain have their own localized functions. Through the use of Noopept, each of these functions can be enhanced through the synthesis of various memories, ideas, and stimuli. There are nuances among these functions that enhance the way we think. That is why a lot of people have claimed that their quality of life had a significant improvement when taking Noopept in regular doses.”

If you want to read more about how Noopept works, its dosaging, and stacking; read the whole article. 

Source: braintropic.com

Source: Noopept

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Kids of Bipolar or Schizophrenic Parents More Likely to Face Early Mental Health Issues

Kids of Bipolar or Schizophrenic Parents More Likely to Face Early Mental Health Issues



This is a wonderful article I found and had to share it with you, my readers. It deals with something I always think about, passing the bipolar gene to your child. It’s not something I’m willing to do, but for those who do decide to have kids, good for you and good luck, with all sincerity. I cannot imagine seeing someone that I made hurt so deeply because of this disease, so that is why my husband and I have choosen to stay child-free. But to each their own. I’m going to highlight the article’s main points, but be sure to read the whole article to really understand. 


“New research shows that children born to one or both parents with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder are more likely to suffer mental health problems by the age of seven.”


“Presented at the International Early Psychosis Association (IEPA) meeting in Milan, Italy, in October 2016, the Danish High Risk and Resilience Study — VIA 7 — included 522 children who were seven at the start of the study.”

“Of the children, 202 were born to at least one person diagnosed with schizophrenia (located using Danish registries), while 120 of them were born to least one parent diagnosed with bipolar disorder. The remaining 200 children were born to parents without any of these diagnoses.”


“The results show children born to parents with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder score higher than the other children using a tool called the child behavior checklist (CBCL). This is a widely used questionnaire with more than 100 questions given to parents and teachers that describes behavioral problems or signs of possible illness, the researchers said, explaining a higher score represents more problems.”

Sample CBCL: 


“Mean scores for children in the schizophrenia group were 27.2, the bipolar group 23.5, and control group 17.1.”

“There were also marked differences between the three groups concerning psychopathology, neurocognition, motor functioning and their home environment, according to the study’s findings.”


“Children born to parents with schizophrenia, and to a minor extent also bipolar disorder, were found to have increased risk for problems such as anxiety, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and stress/adjustment disorder, and were also more likely to display neurocognitive problems or delays. They also were more likely to grow up in families with a lower social status and a higher risk of adverse life events, according to the researchers.”


“She noted the researchers plan to follow the children until age 11, conducting a new assessment before puberty.”

““We do not know if the impaired children will catch up in neurocognitive areas or if their mental problems will be in remission, but since social aspects and environmental factors contribute significantly to child development — and they were quite marked already at age seven years — we are expecting similar or even worse results could be seen at age 11 years,” she said.”


Source: psychcentral.com

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ADHD Foods – The Good and the Bad

ADHD Foods – The Good and the Bad


I have ADHD, so trying to focus and be alert is quite a chore for me. I do take medication, which helps me tremendously, but I also like to learn about all-natural ways to heal, so I don’t have to 100% rely on my medicine. Having ADHD is a real struggle sometimes. I also teach dance to children, and also Ballroom to adults. So, when I am teaching a class, my brain must be completely focused and on stay on track with what I teach. I normally do not have problems with my ADHD during work, but there are definitely days when the kids are full of energy and it becomes hard to grab their attention. Those days, I definitely can struggle with my concentration (what was I last teaching?) and sometimes have to take a mental break for a moment to get it together. So, for those reasons, you can see why some extra nutrition is a good call. Her is a quote I found to be moving. I hope you enjoy. 

“What does the food you eat have to do with how your brain functions? Turns out an awful lot. While we’ve always known that what we eat affects our bodies and how we look, scientists are also learning more and more that what we eat takes a toll on our brains. Yes, brain foods matter (especially for our gray matter).”

“Plus, brain foods rich in antioxidants, good fats, vitamins and minerals provide energy and aid in protecting against brain diseases. So when we focus on giving our bodies whole, nutritious foods benefiting both the gut and the brain, we’re actually benefiting our minds and bodies while keeping them both in tip-top shape.”



Source: Foods to Boost Focus and Memory

“A well-rounded diet can have a powerful, positive effect on your cognition, mood, memory, and behavior. The wrong diet can aggrevate ADHD symptoms. Here’s what you should (and absolutely should not) be eating to help your brain and body.”

  • Following an ADHD diet rich in protein and vitamins can help control symptoms of attention deficit. But only if you avoid sugar, artifical flavors, and common allergens as well.

“For years, doctors have speculated that certain foods may have something to do with ADHD. Although much research has been done on the subject, it’s still not believed that food actually causes ADHD. What some foods do seem to do, however, is worsen ADHD symptoms or affect behavior that mimics the signs of ADHD in children. “Excessive caffeine and excessive use of fast foods and other foods of poor nutritional value can cause kids to display behavior that might be confused with ADHD,” said Frank Barnhill, MD, an expert on ADHD and the author of “Mistaken for ADHD.” Read on for a list of foods that have been linked with ADHD symptoms.”


“Candy is loaded with sugar and artificial colors, which is a bad combination when it comes to children with ADHD who often need to follow an ADHD diet. Both of these common ingredients have been shown to promote ADHD symptoms — namely hyperactivity — in studies.”



“If you have ADHD, consider eliminating soda. (And even if you don’t have ADHD, saying no to soda is a good idea anyway.) These sweet drinks often have many of the same sugars and sweeteners that make candy a bad idea for kids on the ADHD diet. Soda also has other ingredients that worsen ADHD symptoms, such as high-fructose corn syrup and caffeine. “Excessive sugar and caffeine intake both cause symptoms of hyperactivity and easy distractibility,” said Dr. Barnhill. One 2013 study also found that 5-year-old children who drank sodas were more likely to show aggression and social withdrawal.”



“Eating fish and other seafood with trace amounts of mercury can exacerbate ADHD symptoms in the long term. Some of the worst culprits are shark, king mackerel, swordfish, and tilefish. “Mercury, like cellulose, is extremely hard to digest and can accumulate in the brain over time,” explained Ali. “This can lead to hyperactivity.” Talk to your doctor or ADHD nutritionist about the best types of fish to include in your ADHD diet.”


“Energy drinks are becoming increasingly popular among kids, especially teens. Unfortunately, they also have a veritable treasure trove of ingredients that can worsen ADHD symptoms: sugar, artificial sweeteners, artificial colors, caffeine, and other stimulants. “Energy drinks are high on the list of things that cause teens to display behaviors mimicking ADHD,” said Barnhill. They have no place in a healthy ADHD diet.”



Source: Terrible Foods For ADHD

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Money and Mental Illness

Money and Mental Illness


I have always thought that money and mental health were linked. After reading up on the topic, it’s clear that there is most certainly a connection. Poor mental health can make managing money more difficult than should be, and the guilt and worrying about money can make your mental health worse.


“For individuals who are affected by or who are vulnerable to mental illness, it’s especially important for them to have a home and regular income.”

“For individuals directly affected by severe mental illness or other mental health difficulties, often it will be difficult to secure or retain full-time paid employment leading to a need to call on the state for some form of financial support in the form of state benefits.”


“Sometime, for certain individuals, mental illness can also impact on ability to manage debts, in situations where this is the case, free advice on managing debt should be sought as soon as difficulties arise by contacting an agency such as Citizens Advice Bureau. The sooner a debt issue is addressed the more successfully (and less stressfully) it can be managed.”


Source: Money & Mental Illness
These are examples of just how money and mental illness are correlated: 

  • “If you can’t work or have to take time off work, your income may be affected.”

  • “If you feel very ‘high’ during a period of mania or hypomania, this can lead to impulsive decisions about money that make sense at the time but leave you in lots of debt.”

  • “You may spend money to make yourself feel better. Spending can give you a temporary high.”

  • “You might feel anxious about doing things like talking on the phone, going to the bank or opening envelopes.”

  • “You may feel forced to do a job you don’t like in order to pay the bills or pay off your debt.”

  • “You may lose the motivation to keep control of your finances.”

  • “You might find that spending any money at all or being in debt can make you feel very anxious – even if you actually have enough money.”

  • “Dealing with the benefits system or being in debt may make you feel stressed, anxious and worried about the future.”

  • “You may not have enough money to spend on essentials or things to keep you well like housing, food, heating or medication.”

  • “Money problems can affect relationships and your social life, which can have a knock-on effect on your mental health.”


Source: Money & Mental Health


Money Problems can manifest into an even bigger deal. Look at what can happen. So manage your stress if you want to stay healthy. 

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WHY MENTAL HEALTH DISORDERS EMERGE IN YOUR EARLY 20’s

WHY MENTAL HEALTH DISORDERS EMERGE IN YOUR EARLY 20’s


I was diagnosed Bipolar around 24, but my husband as well as my mother, both think I developed it early on, I think it developed in my 20’s. The following article articulates why most adults who get diagnosed later in life, may have already had it and it didn’t manifest until later. Enjoy! 


“There’s a reason the image of the floundering, scared, shaky post-teen struggling to enter adulthood is a cliché. Between moving out of your parent’s home, going to college and getting a job, lack of sleep, drugs, and unrestricted access to alcohol, becoming an adult is fucking hard. So it’s no wonder that this period is popularly associated with having a mental breakdown. But is there any truth behind the pop culture trope? What about kids from wealthy families who don’t have the stresses the rest of us do in early adulthood, or people whose most trying times come in their 30s or 40s? Is the appearance of mental illness in young people a matter of environment or biology?”


“To better understand these questions, I phoned Johanna Jarcho, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute of Mental Health whose work studies differences in brain development in healthy people versus those who have mental health problems, with a focus on anxiety. She explained how our brains interact with social conditions to influence our mental health, and why the best way to deal with a problem is to get it diagnosed early.”

“I’ve often heard it repeated that mental illnesses frequently begin in a person’s late adolescence or early 20s. Anecdotally that seems consistent with what I’ve seen, but is there any scientific basis to this claim?”


“Dr. Johanna Jarcho: Yeah, the vast majority of mental health disorders do emerge during one’s adolescence or early 20s. If you’re going to have an anxiety disorder as an adult, there’s a 90% chance that you’ll have had it as an adolescent. Basically, you’re not going to develop an anxiety disorder as an adult. You’re going to develop it as a kid and then it’ll carry through to adulthood. Emerging research suggests that this is because adolescence is a time when the brain is changing to a great degree. We once thought that the brain didn’t change that much after earlier childhood, but what we’ve seen is that the brain continues to undergo really profound changes up until your early 20s. It’s still quite malleable, so being exposed to different influences in your social environment can really have a profound impact on the way that your brain continues to develop.”

“You said that much has to do with brain development. At the same time, young adulthood seems to be a time where people are going through major upheavals, both socially and economically—things like college, entering the workforce, or living away from your parents. Is there a way to quantify the effect of environment versus biology?”



“Some types of mental health disorders are much more genetically based than others. Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder have a much higher rate of inheritance. If you have a first degree relative like a parent or sibling who has one of those disorders, you’re at a much greater risk for developing it yourself, and there are things in the environment that can potentiate that. For other disorders like depression or anxiety, it’s less heritable. Whether or not you develop one of those disorders is a lot more contingent on your environment. Young adults go through all these different social changes, but we evolved to be able to make this big transition from being with parents to forging adulthood. What happens during this transition can definitely have a profound effect on whether you grow to be “healthy” or to have these types of disorders.”


“We’re still finding out more about how much of this is biologically based and how much is environmental. We’ve learned from genetics that it’s not just the genes and it’s not just the environment, it’s an interaction between the two.”


“So a mental illness is not just an inevitable thing that people either will or won’t have?”

No. A lot of us tend to focus on the negative, but it’s really important to focus on the fact that there’s a lot that can be done to protect against developing mental health disorders, even if you are at risk. The social environment could tip you over into becoming sick, but in a good social environment you can actually thrive.”




“What kind of things should people be aware of?”


“It’s important to know what you’re at risk for. Let’s say you had a parent with psychopathology; that certainly is a risk factor. If you’ve had a difficult time engaging in your social world as a kid, that’s another risk factor. If your parents sheltered you instead of giving you some exposure to difficult things and showing you how to cope, that’s another risk factor. The type of parenting that you had as a child can really affect the way you cope with the new challenges as you launch into adulthood.”



“Let’s say a person is starting to experience symptoms of a mental health disorder. What can they do to mitigate harm?”

“The most important thing that you can do to mitigate the effects that any kind of psychopathology might have is to get treatment earlier and when you’re younger. It’s like how habits are formed: they get strengthened over time and once they’re established they become biological, in a way. It’s much more difficult to break them and they stick around for a long time. If you think there’s something that may be wrong, you should try to get help before things become a crisis, before you feel like it’s having profound effects on your life.”

“Health care is so expensive and opaque that I think a lot people have a feeling that, “Maybe I’m depressed, maybe I have anxiety, but I’m probably fine.” They don’t want to potentially spend thousands of dollars seeing a doctor, so they wait until it’s absolutely necessary.”

“If you wait on getting treatment, your symptoms can become much more intractable. You save money in the short term, but your long term spending is much higher. We do preventative care for physical illness, but as a society we aren’t quite there with mental health.”


“What do you make of self-diagnosis forums, WebMD, and other online health tools?”

“I think that because health care has not been readily available in the past, and because there is still a stigma against going to see a mental health professional, people have relied on the internet to understand what’s going on with them. That can be a good first step, and certainly it can underscore the fact that you’re not alone in the types of symptoms that you’re having. But that doesn’t necessarily get you to treatment. It’s important to be able to go to a professional and say, “I think I need help with this.” Certainly the more resources the better, especially for people who haven’t had a lot of exposure to receiving mental health care. It can be scary. The internet can be useful but it doesn’t get you a diagnosis and it doesn’t necessarily get you treatment. But more information is always better.”


To read the rest: corespirit.com

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OCD Awareness Week

OCD Awareness Week- October 9-15, 2016


Ok, so I found out about OCD Awareness Week, a little late. But I still feel like I needed to share it with everyone. I am OCD myself, so I am an advocate for all those who suffer from this disorder. Mine is not bad, I just clean a lot, and keep an immaculately clean house. But I am totally under control with my OCD, thank goodness. 


“Did you know that 1 in 100 adults likely have OCD? And up to 1 in 200 children? That’s a half a million children in the US alone. OCD can be a debilitating disorder, but there is treatment that can help. Unfortunately, it can take up to 14–17 years from the first onset of symptoms for people to get access to effective treatment, due to obstacles such as stigma and a lack of awareness about mental health, and OCD in particular. Learn more about OCD here.”


“OCD Awareness Week is an international effort to raise awareness and understanding about obsessive compulsive disorder and related disorders, with the goal of helping more people to get timely access to appropriate and effective treatment. Launched in 2009 by the IOCDF, OCD Awareness Week is now celebrated by a number of organizations across the US and around the world, with events such as OCD screening days, lectures, conferences, fundraisers, online Q&As, and more.”


Source: ocdweek

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The Mental Health Consequences of Natural Disasters

The Mental Health Consequences of Natural Disasters


“When we see a natural disaster in the news, we might see pictures of houses destroyed and estimates of how many people are dead or injured. For survivors, though, there’s a less tangible kind of damage natural disasters inflict that isn’t talked about as much: damage to people’s mental health. The mental health effects of a natural disaster are felt for years after the event itself.”


“To learn more about how the mental health consequences of natural disasters, researchers from Sichuan University surveyed 435 children and adolescents who had survived two major earthquakes in remote mountainous regions of China.”


“The researchers followed up with participants 12 months and 30 months after the earthquakes. At 12 months, they found that 43.9 percent of the people surveyed had PTSD, 20.9 percent had depression, and 18.9 percent had both PTSD and depression. At 30 months, 15.7 percent of the participants had PTSD while 21.6 still had depression.”


“Several factors predicted which people were more likely to experience PTSD or depression in the wake of the disasters. Specifically, those who had lost a family member, witnessed previous earthquakes, had lower socioeconomic status, or had poor relationships with their parents were at higher risk.”

“Interpreting the result, the authors point out that while some children and adolescents who experience PTSD or depression after natural disasters recover within a couple years, some do not. According to the researchers, “some exhibit chronic, delayed-onset PTSD and depression, especially those with poor relationships with their parents or those living in precarious economic conditions.””



“The idea that those with poor parent-child relationships are more vulnerable to mental health disorders in the years following earthquakes fits with previous research that has found a link between social support and resilience after natural disasters. For example, one study found that social support as well as personality and spiritual beliefs affected how people recovered from the 2008 Sichuan earthquake. Another found that social support predicted quality of life.”



“These studies are a good reminder that some of the many kinds of destruction natural disasters bring with them have to do with mental health. Mental health issues like PTSD and depression make it harder for survivors to move on from what they experienced, and mental health care is an important part of rebuilding after natural disasters.”



Source: Consequences of natural disaster

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