Bipolar and Mental Illnesses are written about here. Written by a bipolar person themselves.

Posts tagged ‘october’

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OCD Awareness Week

OCD Awareness Week- October 9-15, 2016


Ok, so I found out about OCD Awareness Week, a little late. But I still feel like I needed to share it with everyone. I am OCD myself, so I am an advocate for all those who suffer from this disorder. Mine is not bad, I just clean a lot, and keep an immaculately clean house. But I am totally under control with my OCD, thank goodness. 


“Did you know that 1 in 100 adults likely have OCD? And up to 1 in 200 children? That’s a half a million children in the US alone. OCD can be a debilitating disorder, but there is treatment that can help. Unfortunately, it can take up to 14–17 years from the first onset of symptoms for people to get access to effective treatment, due to obstacles such as stigma and a lack of awareness about mental health, and OCD in particular. Learn more about OCD here.”


“OCD Awareness Week is an international effort to raise awareness and understanding about obsessive compulsive disorder and related disorders, with the goal of helping more people to get timely access to appropriate and effective treatment. Launched in 2009 by the IOCDF, OCD Awareness Week is now celebrated by a number of organizations across the US and around the world, with events such as OCD screening days, lectures, conferences, fundraisers, online Q&As, and more.”


Source: ocdweek

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October Gave a Party…

October Gave a Party… 


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Full “Hunters” Moon Tonight – October 15th

Full “Hunters” Moon Tonight – October 15th


“What makes a Hunter’s Moon special? Nature is particularly cooperative around the time of the autumn equinox to make the fall full moonrises unique.”


“Here’s what happens. On average, the moon rises about 50 minutes later each day. But when a full moon happens close to the autumnal equinox – either a Harvest or a Hunter’s Moon – the moon (at mid-temperate latitudes) rises only about 30 to 35 minutes later daily for several days before and after the full moon. The reason is that the ecliptic – or the moon’s orbital path – makes a narrow angle with the evening horizon around the time of the autumn equinox.”


“The result is that there’s a shorter-than-usual lag time between successive moonrises around the full Hunter’s Moon.”

“These early evening moonrises are what make every Hunter’s Moon special. Every full moon rises around sunset. After the full Hunter’s Moon, you’ll see the moon ascending in the east relatively soon after sunset for a few days in a row at northerly latitudes.”


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October’s Full Hunter’s Moon (and Supermoon?) Rises This Weekend

October’s Full Hunter’s Moon (and Supermoon?) Rises This Weekend



“The full Hunter’s Moon of October will rise in the early hours of Sunday morning (Oct. 16) — and by some definitions, it’s also a “supermoon.””



“October’s full Hunter’s Moon follows the full Harvest Moon of September, which falls around the start of the autumn equinox. The moniker Hunter’s Moon was coined in the Northern Hemisphere, and refers to the time of year when deer and other game are fattened, and hunters begin stocking up for the winter months ahead.”


“This month, the full moon of October will peak on Sunday at 12:23 a.m. EDT (0423 GMT). However, to the casual skywatcher, it will also appear full in the night sky a day prior and after it reaches peak fullness.”


“A full moon occurs each month when the sun, Earth and moon line up, with the moon on the opposite side of the Earth to the sun. At this time, the Earth-facing side of the moon is completely lit up by sunlight. A lunar eclipse occurs when the three bodies are lined up such that the moon passes through the shadow of the Earth. Typically, the moon is not completely darkened by the shadow, but instead turns a deep shade of red.”


“October’s full moon will also take place when the moon is at its closest point to Earth in its 27-day lunar orbit (this point is known as perigee). Some people define a full moon at perigee as a supermoon. The supermoon is not a scientific term, however, so there are varying definitions. The Slooh Community Observatory uses the term supermoon only once per year, to refer to the full moon that comes closest to Earth in its orbit, a Slooh representative told Space.com. (In addition, Slooh uses the term “mega moon” instead of supermoon.)”

“In collaboration with The Old Farmer’s Almanac, Slooh will offer a live broadcast for this month’s full moon on Saturday (Oct. 15). You can also watch it live on Space.com, courtesy of Slooh. The broadcast will share facts and history about the full Hunter’s Moon, as well as an interview with Slooh Astronomer Bob Berman, who will discuss the difference between a full moon and a supermoon.”


“October’s full moon has also been assigned a few other names, in addition to Hunter’s Moon. The Old Farmer’s Almanac, for example, also refers to it as the Travel Moon and the Dying Grass Moon, as farmers traditionally harvest their fields in late September or early October.”

“Since the full moon of October falls mid-month, October’s new moon (when no sunlight falls on the Earth-facing side) will rise Oct. 30, just in time for Halloween.”


Source: amp.space.com


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Look of the Week – October 7th

Look of the Week – Aztec Sweaters


Aztec sweaters are being seen everywhere, and it’s the perfect time of the year for one. I love the bold colors and jagged lines used in the sweaters. You won’t find any curved lines in these Aztec sweaters. They have a harder feel to them due to the straight lines used throughout. I found some cool outfits that incorporate Aztec sweaters in them, as well as, some really cool Aztec sweater looks. 




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Mental Health Awareness Week – October 2-8

Mental Health Awareness Week – October 2-8


Being bipolar myself, I can say that this weeks very important to me. I have become a huge advocate over the last few years about mental illnesses, especially bipolar disorder. I blog about it frequently and try to get the word out to all of my friends and family about how we must be aware of how many Americans are affected by some sort of mental illness. And not only must we know, but we also must be educated, so that you can spot the signs of someone who might be hurting or worse. Suicide prevention is real, and too many times, the signs were there and no one knew what to look for. And depression and anxiety are also forms of mental illnesses too. Please pledge today that you will become closer to your community and learn what you need to know about mental illnesses and how we can all help each other. 




  • Mental Illness Awareness Week
  • Each year millions of Americans face the reality of living with a mental health condition.

“During the first full week of October, NAMI and participants across the country are raising awareness of mental illness. Each year we fight stigma, provide support, educate the public and advocate for equal care. Each year, the movement grows stronger.”

“During Mental Illness Awareness Week on Oct. 2-8, join NAMI in shining a light on mental illness and replacing stigma with hope by taking the #StigmaFree pledge at http://www.nami.org/stigmafree.”


“To help spread the word, NAMI’s #MIAW pages provide a variety of resources to download, such as flyers, posters and social media graphics. Our resource toolkit contains press releases and other templates to customize within your communities.”

“We believe that mental health issues are important to address year-round, but highlighting them during #MIAW provides a time for people to come together and display the passion and strength of those working to improve the lives of the tens of millions of Americans affected by mental illness.”

“If you or someone you know may need a mental health assessment, anonymous online tools are available. For National Depression Screening Day on Oct. 6, you can get a free mental health screening at HelpYourselfHelpOthers.org.”

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October’s Origin

  

Dictionary Blog: October 

  
October is here, flush with falling leaves, chilling weather, and growing anticipation for the holiday season. The tenth month by our Gregorian calendar, October shares a root with octopus and octothorpe—the Latin octo-, meaning “eight.” In the Roman calendar, which had only ten months, October was month eight, as January and February hadn’t yet been added to the calendar. Like its neighboring months September, November, and December, its numerical name stuck; even after Julius Caesar expanded the calendar year from ten months to twelve. October entered Old English via Old French, replacing the English vernacular term Winterfylleð.Children may look forward to October for Halloween, which falls at the month’s close, but beer-lovers may be more excited for what awaits them at the beginning of the month—Oktoberfest. This long-standing beer festival has gained popularity around the world, but the true Oktoberfest is located in Munich, Germany, where the festival has been held since 1810. The Oktoberfest celebration marks the beginning of a new beer-brewing season. Historically, October through March are the optimal beer-brewing months because the colder weather keeps the beer from spoiling. It has long been a tradition to polish off the remaining beer from the year to prepare the casks for a new brew in October. Although the seasonal climate is less relevant to breweries today, the beer festival of Oktoberfest remains a vibrant tradition.

  
Today the majority of Munich’s Oktoberfest actually takes place in late September, but this is perfectly acceptable logic considering that the root of our tenth month’s name means “eight.”

  

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