Bipolar and Mental Illnesses are written about here. Written by a bipolar person themselves.

Posts tagged ‘pain’

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Essential Oils for Pain 

Essential Oils for Pain



I’m a big time advocate for alternative help when it comes to pain. I have chronic back from tumbling as a gymnast and cheerleader. My back went out on me when I was just 17. Many years later, I struggle with chronic pain. I have medication, but I don’t want to use it if I don’t have to. I enjoy using essential oils to help alleviate my pain. If you are in pain, there is an essential oil that can help! 


Here is a list of essential oil’s for different types of pain, for varying pain such as: bone pain, circulation, inflammation, muscles, ligaments, and viruses



Young Living is the best Essential Oils carrier in the business! I love their oils so much more than other brands because of the ingredients it’s made from, and the concentration is much higher than other brands, leaving you needing to use less drops, thus saving you money. Not to mention their scents, I’ve always felt like their scents were much stronger than other brands that I have tried before. It is a little bit more expensive of an essential oils line, but for all of the reasons I listed above. Below is a pain Cream created by Young Living. I am going to try it after I purchase Valor, that is the only Oil I don’t have from the list. 






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Essential Oils for TMJ

Essential Oils for TMJ


  • TMJ (Temporomandibular Joint Syndrome) is inflammation and tightness of the joint that connects the jaw to the skull.”

“The ability to open the mouth completely can be hampered and the jaw can get “stuck” open or closed. Clicking each time when the mouth is opened is often a frequent symptom of TMJ.”

“TMJ causes include any unusual pressure placed on the jawbone such as habitual gum chewing, grinding of the teeth, and misalignment of the teeth or jaw. If TMJ is severe, it can even cause pain in the neck, shoulder and cause headaches.”

“TMJ is frequently worse with stress where more grinding or clenching of the jaw may occur.”

“The good news is there are natural TMJ treatment home remedies that are highly effective for fast relief.”

  • Top Foods for TMJ Diet

“If you want to overcome TMJ, then following a mineral rich anti-inflammatory diet is essential:”

  • Foods easy to chew – While there is jaw pain, include foods that are easy to chew such as soups, stews, smoothies or cooked vegetables.
  • Small meals – Eat small meals to help stabilize blood sugar. Fluctuations in blood sugar can increase grinding of teeth.
  • Wild-caught fish – Omega-3s can help reduce pain and inflammation.
  • Steamed vegetables – These foods are easy to chew and provide important nutrients for healing.
  • Protein shakes – If you have difficulty chewing protein, try for a protein shake instead while the TMJ is flared.
  • Magnesium rich foods – Magnesium is known as the relaxation mineral and can release tension in tight muscles.
  • Foods to Avoid
  • Sugar – Increases inflammation and lowers immune response.
  • Caffeine – May increases muscle tension by dehyrating the muscles.
  • Alcohol – Increases teeth grinding at night.
  • Gum or caramels – Any hard to chew candy can make TMJ worse.
  • Tough foods – Be careful with any foods that are difficult to chew, like dry cuts of meat.

Top 5 TMJ Treatment Home Remedies

#1 Magnesium (250 mg 2-3x daily) Helps relax the muscles and nervous system.

#2 Calcium (500 mg 2x daily) Works with magnesium to aid in muscle relaxation.

#3 Kava (70 mg 3x daily) Helps reduce anxiety and relax the muscles.

#4 MSM (1000 mg 3x daily) A natural anti-inflammatory and reduces muscle spasms.

#5 B-complex (50 mg 2x daily) Helps relieve the effects of stress.

Source: TMJ

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Is Kratom the CBD of Opioids?

Is Kratom the CBD of Opioids?


Kratom is out and showing CBD a thing or two about being a pain medication. You can’t overdose on it, and that makes it safe. If you have pain and use CBD, or marijuana, try Kratom for your pain and find some relief without using opioids. 


Another bad move by the DEA

“It’s been used traditionally as both a medicine and a textile. It’s reportedly helpful for treating drug addiction, and its consumption has never resulted in a documented death from toxic overdose. But the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) considers it a dangerous drug with no medical value.”


Sound familiar?

“No, this isn’t about Cannabis. This is about the leaves of a native Southeast Asian tree commonly known as “Kratom.” Its official botanical name is Mitragyna speciosa, and it’s the only natural source of opioid alkaloids other than the poppy plant.”

“Mitragyna is a small genus in the Rubiaceace family, which includes coffee. Like coffee, Kratom acts as a mild stimulant, an invigorating energy supplement, but only in low doses. At higher doses, it causes a narcotic-like effect and functions as an opiate substitute.”

“Smoked, chewed or steeped in tea, Kratom has a long history as a folk remedy for diarrhea, muscle pain, fever, coughing, hypertension, fatigue, depression, and other ailments. In modern times it has been used to treat opiate withdrawal, anxiety, chronic pain, and to boost the endurance of manual laborers. Despite its proscribed status in several countries, Kratom is still consumed socially during community gatherings in the Asian tropics.”

“The unauthorized use of this herb has spread to Western societies in recent years, much to the chagrin of the DEA and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) officials who view Kratom as a threat to public health. On August 25, 2016, the DEA announced its intention to add Kratom to the list of illegal Schedule I drugs. While this designation, for the moment, is temporary, in all likelihood it will become a permanent ban in the months ahead. (A false story on a bogus “Boston Tribune” website claimed that public protests forced the DEA to reverse course and suspend the scheduled ban.)”


Not your typical painkiller

“At least 25 alkaloids have been isolated from Kratom leaves. Three of these compounds directly activate opiate receptors. Mitragynine (MG), the dominant indole alkaloid found in Kratom, is responsible for much of Kratom’s analgesic activity. MG’s painkilling potency is equal to codeine. Japanese researchers reported in 2004 that MG accounted for 66 percent of a crude Kratom extract and six percent of plant material by dry weight.”

“It’s worth noting that pure, single-molecule MG is actually less effective as a painkiller when compared to equal amounts of MG in a whole plant Kratom extract, which contains many biologically active components, including 7-hydroxymitragynine (7-OH-MG). A potent analgesic, this compound has a high affinity for the mu-opioid receptor, but it is structurally different from other opioids. MGs don’t bind to opiate receptors like an ordinary opiate. What’s more, these promising medicinal compounds can confer novel, beneficial effects that differ from those of pharmaceutical opioids.”

“Preclinical research has determined that Kratom’s physiological properties are mediated by several neurotransmitter systems — dopamine, serotonin, GABA — in addition to its unique interactions at the opioid receptors. But MG’s painkilling activity does not directly involve the cannabinoid CB1 receptor, according to a 2012 study by Malaysian scientists.”


“Much like aspirin, Kratom produces an anti-inflammatory effect by suppressing prostaglandin production in the COX-2 pathway. Cannabidiol (CBD), a potent anti-inflammatory, works through similar channels. Could Kratom be the CBD of the opiate world?”


Source: projectcbd.org

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Yoga for Sciatica Nerve Pain and other Remedies

Yoga for Sciatica Nerve Pain and other remedies







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The Yoga for Your Lower Back

Yoga for Your Lower Back

I know after a long day, gravity has compressed my back and I get terrible back pain. The following three pages of exercises are the best way that I alleviate pain. Especially the first set of workout exercises. I swear by it! Try them today. 



*Try these exercises at the office to take some pressure off your lower back.


Sciatica Pain Relievers

These simple poses target the tight muscle that often causes sciatic pain: the piriformis.

7 Poses to Soothe Sciatica

“Sciatica has a long (and painful!) history. As far back as the 5th century BCE, doctors and sufferers alike have tried a host of imaginative remedies, from leeches and hot coals in Roman times to 20th-century use of creams and injections. The principle causes of sciatic pain are less mysterious than its heritage suggests, yet there are still millions who suffer from it. In 2005, the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine estimated that more than 5 percent of the adult population in the United States suffers from sciatica, and over a lifetime, an individual has a 40 percent probability of experiencing it. But here’s the good news: in many cases, a mindful, targeted yoga practice can help you overcome the pain.”

“By definition, sciatica is tenderness and pain anywhere along the sciatic nerve, typically showing up on one side of the body. There are two sciatic nerves—one for each leg. These are the longest nerves in the human body. Each originates from several nerve roots that exit from the spinal cord, then thread through apertures in your sacrum and merge to form the main body of the sciatic nerve. The sciatic nerve passes between layers of the deep buttock muscles (gluteus medius and gluteus maximus), through the deep muscles of the back of the thigh, and down through the outer edge of your leg to your foot.”

Symptoms of Sciatica

“Sciatica frequently flares up while bending over, running, sitting (especially driving) and during many other everyday movements, both active and passive. Symptoms can include:

  • Pain anywhere along the sciatic nerve pathway: in the lower back, buttock, back of the thigh, and/or calf.
  • Fatigue, numbness, or loss of feeling in your legs and/or feet.
  • An electric, tingling, burning, pinching, or pins-and-needles feeling known as paresthesia.
  • Weakness that can cause your knees to buckle when you stand up from sitting.
  • Foot drop: a condition in which you are not able to flex your ankles enough to walk on your heels.
  • Reduced reflexes in your Achilles tendon and knee.”

“The presence of sciatic pain often leads doctors to look for a herniated disk in the lumbar spine, which may be pressing against the sciatic nerve. This is a significant problem, and it’s especially important to have your disks checked out by a doctor if you are experiencing pain in your mid-lower back, painful electric shocks down your sciatic nerve, and/or tingling, burning, weakness, or numbness in your legs or feet. These can be signs that an acute herniated disk is pinching the nerve, which is a bigger problem than sciatic pain alone.”

“Sciatica can also be caused by a small but significant muscle deep within your hip—the piriformis. In fact, another 2005 study in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine showed that nearly 70 percent of sciatica cases are caused by this muscle. The piriformis is one of a few small deep hip rotators that you use to turn your thigh out. It also extends your hip when you walk, and abducts the thigh (i.e., takes it out to the side) when your hip is flexed. The sciatic nerve is sandwiched between the piriformis and the small hard tendons that lie against the bone of the sacrum and pelvic bone. If the piriformis is tight (and it often is), it exerts pressure on the sciatic nerve and pushes it against the tendons beneath it, which can cause excruciating pain; this is known as the piriformis syndrome.”

How can you tell if the problem originates in the piriformis? Here are a few indicators:

  • Pain and a pins-and-needles sensation down the outside of your calf to the web space between the little and fourth toes.
  • Difficulty walking on your heels or on your toes.
  • Burning in the back of your thigh and calf down to your heel, with stiffness in your legs. (Note: In some cases this can signal a problem in the spine instead of the piriformis.)
  • Pain from sitting, accompanied by a tingling sensation at the back of your thigh. The pain may be relieved by standing, but you still experience numbness in all of your toes even when standing.
  • Buttock and sciatic pain from exercising or sitting for long periods of time, with or without sensations of numbness, weakness, or tingling. While the pain may appear during standing activities, it gets worse when you sit down.

The Basic Piriformis Stretch: Ardha Matsyendrasana

“A simple half spinal twist (ardha matsyendrasana) gives the piriformis a mild stretch that encourages it to release and lengthen, and the intensity can be progressively increased as you approach the full pose. Stretching the muscle too aggressively can provoke sciatic pain, so it’s important to proceed carefully, using the following variations and adjusting the pose so that you feel minimal discomfort. The descriptions are intended to stretch the piriformis in the left hip; be sure to repeat on the other side.”

Prep for Spinal Twist

“Sit on the corner of a folded blanket with your knees bent and your feet on the floor in front of you. Take your right foot under your left knee and around to the outside of your left hip. Your right knee should point straight forward. For the mildest hip stretch, place your left foot on the floor to the inside of your right knee, so that the left foot is roughly in line with your left hip; for a stronger stretch, place your left foot to the outside of your right knee. It’s likely that your left sit bone is now lighter on the floor than your right. Lean onto your left sit bone to balance the weight between the two hips; this is the beginning of the stretch. Steady yourself by holding your left knee with your hands, and from this balanced foundation, inhale and lengthen upward through your spine. If the stretch is too intense or if you feel pain radiating down your leg, increase the height of the padding under your hips until the stretch is tolerable.”

“If you don’t feel a stretch in your left hip, gently pull your left knee across the midline of your body toward the right side of your chest, keeping your sit bones equally grounded, and resist your thigh slightly against the pull of your hands. This action will help keep your sit bone grounded and increase the stretch to the piriformis.

Stay in the pose anywhere from 20 seconds to a couple of minutes, then repeat on the other side. Do two to four sets at a time. As your piriformis muscles stretch out over time, gradually decrease the height of your blankets until you can sit on the floor.”

Simple Seated Twist

“In the full version of ardha matsyendrasana, your upper body turns toward the upright knee. To help your upper body turn fully, place your left hand on the floor behind you; continue to hold your left knee with your right hand. Keep your heart lifted and keep the natural inward curve in your lower back. Use your inhalation to lift, lengthen, and expand; use your exhalation to twist without rounding your back.”

“Now you can deepen the action on the piriformis by increasing the resisted abduction of the thigh, while releasing any tightness in the groin. As you twist, use your hand on your left knee to gently draw or hug that knee toward your chest. Let your inner thigh or groin relax, allowing it to soften and melt downward toward the sit bone. As you draw the knee toward your chest with resistance, your thigh bone laterally releases out at the hip, pressing against the piriformis and encouraging it to release.”

“The twist deepens as you draw your knee into your elbow or take your upper arm to the outside of your knee. At this point, as you press your knee against the arm to leverage a deeper twist, the pose becomes more active in the hip and less effective as a piriformis release. If you’re suffering from piriformis syndrome, you certainly don’t want to tighten this muscle further, so it’s best not to try to go so deeply into the twist!”

Standing Twist

“The standing twist is a milder standing version of the stretch in ardha matsyendrasana. Like the F.A.I.R. test, it brings the thigh into adduction and internal rotation. Place a chair against the wall. To stretch your right hip, stand with your right side next to the wall. Place your right foot on the chair, with your knee bent to roughly 90 degrees. Keep your standing leg straight, and steady your balance by placing your right hand on the wall. Lift your left heel up high, coming onto the mounds of the toes, and turn your body toward the wall, using your hands for balance. As you exhale, lower your left heel to the floor, maintaining the twist. Allow your right hip to descend, keeping your hips relatively level. Hold for several breaths.”

More Stretches for Sciatica

“Hamstring stretches also play an important role in relieving sciatic pain, because tight hamstrings can gang up with a tight piriformis to constrict the vulnerable sciatic nerve. Sciatic pain caused by a tightening of the hamstrings and surrounding muscles often comes from activities such as driving for long periods, especially when the car seat encourages a slumped or rounded posture, or during athletic activities. In these cases, take a rest stop or a break, and try the following hamstring stretches.”

3 Helpful Hip Openers

“In general, sciatic pain is helped by poses that passively stretch the hip with the thigh externally rotated, but not from poses such as baddha konasana (cobbler’s pose) which actively rotate the thigh outward and thus tighten the deep hip rotators.”

Modified Gomukhasana

“Gomukhasana (cow’s face pose) is a good example of a passive stretch to the hip rotators. Sit on the floor and extend your legs forward in dandasana (staff pose). If you have trouble sitting upright, you can sit on the edge of a blanket, but also keep a second blanket or a towel nearby. Bend your right knee and bring your right leg over and across your left leg. Use your hand to draw your right foot close to your outer left hip. Move your left foot across the midline to the right. Using your hands on the floor, lift and wiggle your hips until your knees are stacked, with your right knee above your left.”

King Pigeon Hip Stretch

“Raja kapotasana (king pigeon pose) is the strongest of the piriformis stretches. Bring yourself only to the edge of the stretch, so that you can remain there, breathe, and allow the piriformis to release. Start on your hands and knees. Bring your right knee forward and out to the right. Bring your right foot forward as well, until your heel is in line with your left hip and your shin is at about a 45-degree angle. Keep your foot flexed to protect your knee. To stretch the right piriformis, lean your upper body forward, tuck your left toes under, and slide or walk your left leg straight back, allowing your right thigh to rotate out passively as your hip descends toward the floor. Keep your hips level to the floor and square to the front of the mat; don’t let your pelvis turn or fall to one side. Support your right hip with a blanket if it does not reach the floor, and remain in the pose for anywhere from several breaths to a minute. Experiment with leaning your upper body forward over your shin, and with bringing your torso more upright to vary the stretch to the hip.”

A way to be on this earth and not shy away from the pain

Everything Matters: Beyond Meds

green earthBy Jen Peer Rich

Wow. Just wow! A wave of gratitude arriving on the shores of a radical earth based faith that is lived, a faith that is in and of itself, nature being natural. Nature engages constantly with itself like this.

I’ll share here that there is this heartbreak in me, a general sadness and despair I feel about many of the issues we face as a collective earth and as a human species. The suffering on this planet often overwhelms me. I sense along with many other animals that whether by natural events or by our own human hands, probably a convergence of both, this earth our home and everything that lives on it is in for massive changes and challenges in the next century and we will need new ways to engage on this planet if we are to make it without devolving into a big ugly…

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