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Posts tagged ‘pose’

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Yoga – Utkatasana (Chair Pose) 

Yoga – Utkatasana (Chair Pose) 

I loved being yoga! I have been studying the art for about 5 years now. And I love to share about yoga, but I like to keep it t simple and sweet. This post shares all about the chair pose and its benefits, as well as a step-by-step guide to help make sure you are doing everything with correct technique. That is truly the most important thing about yoga, to fully understand it and get something out of it, you must have correct technique or you will not work the correct muscles or areas of intent. I found some sweet articles that  will inform you on how and why you should try this pose out today. You’re never too late to start something new!

Meaning of the Word, and How to Pronounce: Utkatasana              

  • (OOT-kah-TAHS-anna)
  • utkata = powerful, fierce

  • Why do we do the Utkatasana? 

“This asana increases strength, balance and stability. The hamstrings, quadriceps, gluteal muscles, and the erector spinae muscles of the back are exercised and strengthened. The erector muscles contract isometrically to keep the normal curvature of the spine. The anterior lower leg muscles are also strengthened and developed. These include the tibialis anterior, extensor hallucis longus, extensor digitorum longus, and peroneus tertius. This group of muscles primarily extends the toes and dorsiflexes the ankle and are used for balance and stability.”

Source: Chair Pose

  • Step-By-Step Guide to do the Chair Pose:
  1. “Stand in Tadasana. Inhale and raise your arms perpendicular to the floor. Either keep the arms parallel, palms facing inward, or join the palms.”
  2. “Exhale and bend your knees, trying to take the thighs as nearly parallel to the floor as possible. The knees will project out over the feet, and the torso will lean slightly forward over the thighs until the front torso forms approximately a right angle with the tops of the thighs. Keep the inner thighs parallel to each other and press the heads of the thigh bones down toward the heels.”
  3. “Firm your shoulder blades against the back. Take your tailbone down toward the floor and in toward your pubis to keep the lower back long.”
  4. “Stay for 30 seconds to a minute. To come out of this pose straighten your knees with an inhalation, lifting strongly through the arms. Exhale and release your arms to your sides into Tadasana.”

Source: Yogajournal.com

Here is a variation of the chair pose, the chair pose twist or revolved chair pose: Parivrtta Utkatasana 



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Tittibhasana (Firefly Pose) Yoga

Tittibhasana is a yoga pose used to strengthen the arms and wrists. It is a challenging pose, that is definitely not a beginning pose. But if you are capable of doing this, it is a very satisfying pose that makes you feel like you’re floating when you lift the body up. 




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Yoga Sequences 

Yoga Sequences



If you’re looking for something new in your workout, add yoga to your life. It helps you stretch and become flexible. Yoga has been around forever, and if you’ve never tried it, do! When I do my yoga, I feel better after each practice because of the meditation and silence. Once you become good at a sequence you can enjoy the practice more because of the breathing involved. The breath takes you from one pose to the next. I hope you try it today. 

If you are truly a beginner, here are the best poses for you to try out and practice before actually moving on to sequences. 

If you like to workout in the morning, I find these exercises are good for waking up the body and your circulation. 

When you begin doing series, or sequences of poses, make sure to have each breath move you from pose to pose with each inhale to exhale. Here is an example of a great first time flow.

If you have been practicing for a while and you are wanting a new workout program, I found two 20-minute workouts that have proven well for me. They’re not too intense, but they shaped up my arms, abs and legs quickly. 

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Yoga for Sleep (Insomnia)

  
Yoga for Better Sleep
1. Padangusthasana – “Big Toe Pose”

This pose gently lengthens and strengthens even stubbornly tight hamstrings

  
2. Setu Bandha Sarvangasana – “Bridge Pose”

Bridge Pose can be whatever you need—energizing, rejuvenating, or luxuriously restorative

   
   

3. Marjaryasna – “Cat Pose”

This pose provides a gentle massage to the spine and belly organs

   
 
4. Savasana – “Corpse Pose”

Savasana is a pose of total relaxation—making it one of the most challenging

   
   

5. Bitilasana – “Cow Pose”

Cow Pose is an easy, gentle way to warm up the spine.

   
   

6. “Dolphin Pose”

Dolphin pose strengthens the core, arms, and legs, while also nicely opening the shoulders

   
 

7. Adho Mukha Svanasana – “Downward-Facing Dog”

Deservedly one of yoga’s most widely recognized yoga poses, Adho Mukha Svanasana, offer the ultimate all-over, rejuvenating stretch
   
 

8. Sukhasana – “Easy Pose”

Don’t let the name fool you. If you’re used to sitting in chairs, Easy Pose or Sukhasana can be quite challenging

   
 
9. Uttana Shishosana – Extended Puppy Pose”

A cross between Child’s Pose and Downward Facing Dog, Extended Puppy Pose lengthens the spine and calms the mind.

   
   

10. Agnistambhasana – “Fire Log Pose”

The Fire Log Pose stretches the outer hips intensely, particularly the piriformis, which is often the main culprit of sciatic pain

   
 

Tips:

  

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Yoga Pose – Grasshopper

   
 

   

Here’s another explanation as to how to get into this complex pose:


Go home and try this pose today! The grasshopper may seem intimidating & complex, but it is very rewarding when you can find your center in this pose!

 

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Fallen Angel Yoga Pose

   
 
Here are some great examples of different ways to do this difficult pose. It is very rewarding if you can find your balance in this pose!

   
    
   

 

Sciatica Pain Relievers

These simple poses target the tight muscle that often causes sciatic pain: the piriformis.

7 Poses to Soothe Sciatica

“Sciatica has a long (and painful!) history. As far back as the 5th century BCE, doctors and sufferers alike have tried a host of imaginative remedies, from leeches and hot coals in Roman times to 20th-century use of creams and injections. The principle causes of sciatic pain are less mysterious than its heritage suggests, yet there are still millions who suffer from it. In 2005, the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine estimated that more than 5 percent of the adult population in the United States suffers from sciatica, and over a lifetime, an individual has a 40 percent probability of experiencing it. But here’s the good news: in many cases, a mindful, targeted yoga practice can help you overcome the pain.”

“By definition, sciatica is tenderness and pain anywhere along the sciatic nerve, typically showing up on one side of the body. There are two sciatic nerves—one for each leg. These are the longest nerves in the human body. Each originates from several nerve roots that exit from the spinal cord, then thread through apertures in your sacrum and merge to form the main body of the sciatic nerve. The sciatic nerve passes between layers of the deep buttock muscles (gluteus medius and gluteus maximus), through the deep muscles of the back of the thigh, and down through the outer edge of your leg to your foot.”

Symptoms of Sciatica

“Sciatica frequently flares up while bending over, running, sitting (especially driving) and during many other everyday movements, both active and passive. Symptoms can include:

  • Pain anywhere along the sciatic nerve pathway: in the lower back, buttock, back of the thigh, and/or calf.
  • Fatigue, numbness, or loss of feeling in your legs and/or feet.
  • An electric, tingling, burning, pinching, or pins-and-needles feeling known as paresthesia.
  • Weakness that can cause your knees to buckle when you stand up from sitting.
  • Foot drop: a condition in which you are not able to flex your ankles enough to walk on your heels.
  • Reduced reflexes in your Achilles tendon and knee.”

“The presence of sciatic pain often leads doctors to look for a herniated disk in the lumbar spine, which may be pressing against the sciatic nerve. This is a significant problem, and it’s especially important to have your disks checked out by a doctor if you are experiencing pain in your mid-lower back, painful electric shocks down your sciatic nerve, and/or tingling, burning, weakness, or numbness in your legs or feet. These can be signs that an acute herniated disk is pinching the nerve, which is a bigger problem than sciatic pain alone.”

“Sciatica can also be caused by a small but significant muscle deep within your hip—the piriformis. In fact, another 2005 study in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine showed that nearly 70 percent of sciatica cases are caused by this muscle. The piriformis is one of a few small deep hip rotators that you use to turn your thigh out. It also extends your hip when you walk, and abducts the thigh (i.e., takes it out to the side) when your hip is flexed. The sciatic nerve is sandwiched between the piriformis and the small hard tendons that lie against the bone of the sacrum and pelvic bone. If the piriformis is tight (and it often is), it exerts pressure on the sciatic nerve and pushes it against the tendons beneath it, which can cause excruciating pain; this is known as the piriformis syndrome.”

How can you tell if the problem originates in the piriformis? Here are a few indicators:

  • Pain and a pins-and-needles sensation down the outside of your calf to the web space between the little and fourth toes.
  • Difficulty walking on your heels or on your toes.
  • Burning in the back of your thigh and calf down to your heel, with stiffness in your legs. (Note: In some cases this can signal a problem in the spine instead of the piriformis.)
  • Pain from sitting, accompanied by a tingling sensation at the back of your thigh. The pain may be relieved by standing, but you still experience numbness in all of your toes even when standing.
  • Buttock and sciatic pain from exercising or sitting for long periods of time, with or without sensations of numbness, weakness, or tingling. While the pain may appear during standing activities, it gets worse when you sit down.

The Basic Piriformis Stretch: Ardha Matsyendrasana

“A simple half spinal twist (ardha matsyendrasana) gives the piriformis a mild stretch that encourages it to release and lengthen, and the intensity can be progressively increased as you approach the full pose. Stretching the muscle too aggressively can provoke sciatic pain, so it’s important to proceed carefully, using the following variations and adjusting the pose so that you feel minimal discomfort. The descriptions are intended to stretch the piriformis in the left hip; be sure to repeat on the other side.”

Prep for Spinal Twist

“Sit on the corner of a folded blanket with your knees bent and your feet on the floor in front of you. Take your right foot under your left knee and around to the outside of your left hip. Your right knee should point straight forward. For the mildest hip stretch, place your left foot on the floor to the inside of your right knee, so that the left foot is roughly in line with your left hip; for a stronger stretch, place your left foot to the outside of your right knee. It’s likely that your left sit bone is now lighter on the floor than your right. Lean onto your left sit bone to balance the weight between the two hips; this is the beginning of the stretch. Steady yourself by holding your left knee with your hands, and from this balanced foundation, inhale and lengthen upward through your spine. If the stretch is too intense or if you feel pain radiating down your leg, increase the height of the padding under your hips until the stretch is tolerable.”

“If you don’t feel a stretch in your left hip, gently pull your left knee across the midline of your body toward the right side of your chest, keeping your sit bones equally grounded, and resist your thigh slightly against the pull of your hands. This action will help keep your sit bone grounded and increase the stretch to the piriformis.

Stay in the pose anywhere from 20 seconds to a couple of minutes, then repeat on the other side. Do two to four sets at a time. As your piriformis muscles stretch out over time, gradually decrease the height of your blankets until you can sit on the floor.”

Simple Seated Twist

“In the full version of ardha matsyendrasana, your upper body turns toward the upright knee. To help your upper body turn fully, place your left hand on the floor behind you; continue to hold your left knee with your right hand. Keep your heart lifted and keep the natural inward curve in your lower back. Use your inhalation to lift, lengthen, and expand; use your exhalation to twist without rounding your back.”

“Now you can deepen the action on the piriformis by increasing the resisted abduction of the thigh, while releasing any tightness in the groin. As you twist, use your hand on your left knee to gently draw or hug that knee toward your chest. Let your inner thigh or groin relax, allowing it to soften and melt downward toward the sit bone. As you draw the knee toward your chest with resistance, your thigh bone laterally releases out at the hip, pressing against the piriformis and encouraging it to release.”

“The twist deepens as you draw your knee into your elbow or take your upper arm to the outside of your knee. At this point, as you press your knee against the arm to leverage a deeper twist, the pose becomes more active in the hip and less effective as a piriformis release. If you’re suffering from piriformis syndrome, you certainly don’t want to tighten this muscle further, so it’s best not to try to go so deeply into the twist!”

Standing Twist

“The standing twist is a milder standing version of the stretch in ardha matsyendrasana. Like the F.A.I.R. test, it brings the thigh into adduction and internal rotation. Place a chair against the wall. To stretch your right hip, stand with your right side next to the wall. Place your right foot on the chair, with your knee bent to roughly 90 degrees. Keep your standing leg straight, and steady your balance by placing your right hand on the wall. Lift your left heel up high, coming onto the mounds of the toes, and turn your body toward the wall, using your hands for balance. As you exhale, lower your left heel to the floor, maintaining the twist. Allow your right hip to descend, keeping your hips relatively level. Hold for several breaths.”

More Stretches for Sciatica

“Hamstring stretches also play an important role in relieving sciatic pain, because tight hamstrings can gang up with a tight piriformis to constrict the vulnerable sciatic nerve. Sciatic pain caused by a tightening of the hamstrings and surrounding muscles often comes from activities such as driving for long periods, especially when the car seat encourages a slumped or rounded posture, or during athletic activities. In these cases, take a rest stop or a break, and try the following hamstring stretches.”

3 Helpful Hip Openers

“In general, sciatic pain is helped by poses that passively stretch the hip with the thigh externally rotated, but not from poses such as baddha konasana (cobbler’s pose) which actively rotate the thigh outward and thus tighten the deep hip rotators.”

Modified Gomukhasana

“Gomukhasana (cow’s face pose) is a good example of a passive stretch to the hip rotators. Sit on the floor and extend your legs forward in dandasana (staff pose). If you have trouble sitting upright, you can sit on the edge of a blanket, but also keep a second blanket or a towel nearby. Bend your right knee and bring your right leg over and across your left leg. Use your hand to draw your right foot close to your outer left hip. Move your left foot across the midline to the right. Using your hands on the floor, lift and wiggle your hips until your knees are stacked, with your right knee above your left.”

King Pigeon Hip Stretch

“Raja kapotasana (king pigeon pose) is the strongest of the piriformis stretches. Bring yourself only to the edge of the stretch, so that you can remain there, breathe, and allow the piriformis to release. Start on your hands and knees. Bring your right knee forward and out to the right. Bring your right foot forward as well, until your heel is in line with your left hip and your shin is at about a 45-degree angle. Keep your foot flexed to protect your knee. To stretch the right piriformis, lean your upper body forward, tuck your left toes under, and slide or walk your left leg straight back, allowing your right thigh to rotate out passively as your hip descends toward the floor. Keep your hips level to the floor and square to the front of the mat; don’t let your pelvis turn or fall to one side. Support your right hip with a blanket if it does not reach the floor, and remain in the pose for anywhere from several breaths to a minute. Experiment with leaning your upper body forward over your shin, and with bringing your torso more upright to vary the stretch to the hip.”

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