Bipolar and Mental Illnesses are written about here. Written by a bipolar person themselves.

Posts tagged ‘social’

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Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy

Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy

Being bipolar, I am constantly reading about the disorder and different therapeutic ways to work through it. I am a huge believer of cognitive therapy and always enjoyed talking with my psychologists, back when I needed therapy. Today I am in a much better head space, and still like to read up on therapies for bipolar disorder. Interpersonal and social rhythm therapy seems like a great therapy to treat the disorder. I wish I had known about it years ago, it might have helped expedite my progress. But no therapy can help the way time does. The following article is all about IPSRT. I hope you learn something from it that you can pass on to friends, family, co-workers and others. 


Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy is a specific type of psychotherapy developed to help people with bipolar disorder. Its focus is on helping people identify and maintain the regular routines of everyday life — including sleep patterns — and solving interpersonal issues and problems that may arise that directly impact a person’s routines.”


That’s right! Having Bipolar Disorder is hard on your circadian rhythm, meaning sleep signals are sent out to your brain at wrong times during the day, which makes people with BD need naps. Having a circadian rhythm that does not ideally work when it should makes those with sleep problems even more out of synch. 


This is a normal circadian rhythm cycle:


“Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy (IPSRT) is founded upon the belief that disruptions of our circadian rhythms and sleep deprivation may provoke or exacerbate the symptoms commonly associated with bipolar disorder. Its approach to treatment uses methods both from interpersonal psychotherapy, as well as cognitive-behavioral techniques to help people maintain their routines. In IPSRT, the therapist works with the client to better understand the importance of circadian rhythms and routines in our life, including eating, sleeping, and other daily activities. Clients are taught to extensively track their moods everyday. Once routines are identified, IPSRT therapy seeks to help the individual keep the routines consistent and address those problems that arise that might upset the routines. This often involves a focus on building better and healthier interpersonal relationships and skills.”


This picture depicts the sun going through our eyelids sending us “wake” signals. For those of us with BD, these signals get sent more than usual and during the night. Just as confusing, “sleep” signals are also sent during the daytime, causing drowsiness, needs to rest. 



“When Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy is combined with psychiatric medications, research has shown that people can achieve gains in their targeted lifestyle routines, reduce both manic and depressive symptoms, and increase days of maintaining a consistent, regular mood. Like most psychotherapies, not everyone will respond to a course of IPSRT, but for those people who do respond, most have a reduction in the symptoms associated with bipolar disorder.”

Trazodone:  Sleeping Aide 


I have dealt with insomnia my entire life, since about 16. Today, I take Trazodone to go to sleep. It has a sedating effect to really put me to sleep and stay that way. It allows me to sleep for at least 8 hrs, and I awake alert and not groggy. Also, it keeps me asleep the entire night. No sleep pill has ever helped me so much. I have tried almost every sleeping pill on the market, including Ambien and Lunesta, which should only be taken if you do NOT consume alcohol. It can totally make you sleep walk and do things you might regret in the morning. My husband has worked in a pharmacy for over 16 years, and I cannot believe the crazy stories that he tells me about what customers do on Ambien. So to wrap up, if you have insomnia, and really want relief, ask your doctor if you can try trazodone. I’m not selling this drug at all, it has just made such a big impact on my life. Getting sleep versus no sleep is the much better route. 


“Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy is practiced in both inpatient and outpatient settings, but is most often used as a treatment for people who have bipolar disorder in an outpatient, office-based setting. IPSRT is virtually always prescribed in conjunction with psychiatric medications used to treat bipolar disorder, such as lithium or an atypical antipsychotic.”



Source: Interpersonal & Social Rhythm Therapy

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Five Tips to Make Your Content Stand Out From the Crowd

  

Make Your Content Stand Out“Nine out of 10 B2B marketers are actively using content marketing, regardless of their size or industry.”

“Here are some lessons learning from the world of content marketing.”

  

1. Focus on engagement

“The objective of content marketing has shifted from lead generation to developing effective engagement. A total of 88% of marketers now view the primary goals of content marketing to be enhancing customer loyalty and prospect/customer engagement, according to a survey by Smart Insights.”

“There is no shortage of content, so marketers need to find ways to enhance the customer experience by going beyond a presentation or a whitepaper. Marketers need an interactive engagement to keep their prospects and customers actively involved.”

“Using content marketing to deliver a compelling story allows marketers to build an emotional connection with the audience, bringing to life the information and making it relevant, interesting, and useful.”

“When people are involved in digesting information via an interactive experience (as compared with a passive experience, such as watching a video or reading a whitepaper), they retain up to three times as much information.”

“In an interactive experience, each piece of content is only presented when and where the user chooses, ensuring that each person gets to navigate a highly relevant and more individual understanding of the products and solutions. Each user decides what sections to explore, and in what sequence and level of detail.”

 
 2. Show, don’t tell

“Experience has demonstrated that visuals combined with text copy are much more effective than either text or visuals alone.”

“The content marketing tactic that increased the most in 2014 was infographics. When multiple senses are employed in processing information, the level of retention increases.”

“As the world moves towards more bite-sized chunks of information (e.g., 140-character tweets), the use of visual imagery to convey important information becomes more effective. The combination of well-designed text copy in concert with visuals dramatically enhances the cognitive processes used when reading or scanning documents, and this is incredibly useful for content marketers.”

“Rather than discussing an increase in product functionality over time, for example, a thought-provoking chart with a clear depiction of a rising arrow sends the message that grabs the reader’s attention. The complementary text describing how the product’s functionality has expanded reinforces the underlying message by both adding credibility and creating specific information the reader remembers.”

  
3. Make content personal

“Though the marketing team strives for delivering a consistent message about solutions and products, the way that the prospect experiences the message can be highly personalized to suit his or her needs.”

“Personalization will continue to be a focus of marketing attention for the rest of 2015, especially with the continuing development of marketing automation tools that allow for more unique and relevant deliverables.”

“Marketers in companies of all sizes can directly target customers based on specific titles, needs/wants, and stage in the buyer’s journey, which means not only personalizing email greetings but delivering specialized content to each category of user. If customers are reading, comprehending, and interacting with the meaningful content created and sent to them, they will have an elevated experience and greater knowledge retention. That translates into increased usage and sales.”

“Some 78% of the most successful marketers are creating more content than they did a year ago, so delivering a more relevant and personalized piece of content is becoming more necessary (and effective).”

  
4. Reuse and repurpose content

“Forbes recently reported that 69% of CEOs believe that their marketing organizations waste money on redundant marketing initiatives. Apparently, marketers agree.”

  
“Successful marketers know that by maximizing their investments through repurposing their deliverables, they can help alleviate this concern. In a 2014 survey, conducted by MarketingProfs and the Content Marketing Institute, 86% of CMOs said they were also looking for ways to repurpose content across new platforms within the next 12months, without recreating or reformatting it in any way.”

“Rather than creating individual marketing deliverables for each event or product launch, and instead of spending money on content specific to a channel or device, focus on reusing and repurposing the same content marketing applications across any device or marketing channel.”

  
“Similar to responsive design, new marketing platforms (like the Kaon Application Delivery Network) are finally allowing for interactive content to be created once and deployed everywhere (mobile devices, tablets, desktops, websites, touch screens, etc.). This gives companies the ability to create one cost-effective “user-driven” piece of content that can address multiple constituents within the buying ecosystem, across multiple selling environments (sales meetings, websites, trade shows, briefing centers, training, etc.). Same brand, same message, same value story.”

  
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Five Tips to Make Your Content Stand Out From the Crowd
by Gavin Finn

Published on July 10, 2015

Nine out of 10 B2B marketers are actively using content marketing, regardless of their size or industry.
Here are some lessons learning from the world of content marketing.
1. Focus on engagement
The objective of content marketing has shifted from lead generation to developing effective engagement. A total of 88% of marketers now view the primary goals of content marketing to be enhancing customer loyalty and prospect/customer engagement, according to a survey by Smart Insights.
There is no shortage of content, so marketers need to find ways to enhance the customer experience by going beyond a presentation or a whitepaper. Marketers need an interactive engagement to keep their prospects and customers actively involved.
Using content marketing to deliver a compelling story allows marketers to build an emotional connection with the audience, bringing to life the information and making it relevant, interesting, and useful.
When people are involved in digesting information via an interactive experience (as compared with a passive experience, such as watching a video or reading a whitepaper), they retain up to three times as much information.
In an interactive experience, each piece of content is only presented when and where the user chooses, ensuring that each person gets to navigate a highly relevant and more individual understanding of the products and solutions. Each user decides what sections to explore, and in what sequence and level of detail.
2. Show, don’t tell
Experience has demonstrated that visuals combined with text copy are much more effective than either text or visuals alone.
The content marketing tactic that increased the most in 2014 was infographics. When multiple senses are employed in processing information, the level of retention increases.
As the world moves towards more bite-sized chunks of information (e.g., 140-character tweets), the use of visual imagery to convey important information becomes more effective. The combination of well-designed text copy in concert with visuals dramatically enhances the cognitive processes used when reading or scanning documents, and this is incredibly useful for content marketers.
Rather than discussing an increase in product functionality over time, for example, a thought-provoking chart with a clear depiction of a rising arrow sends the message that grabs the reader’s attention. The complementary text describing how the product’s functionality has expanded reinforces the underlying message by both adding credibility and creating specific information the reader remembers.
3. Make content personal
Though the marketing team strives for delivering a consistent message about solutions and products, the way that the prospect experiences the message can be highly personalized to suit his or her needs.
Personalization will continue to be a focus of marketing attention for the rest of 2015, especially with the continuing development of marketing automation tools that allow for more unique and relevant deliverables.
Marketers in companies of all sizes can directly target customers based on specific titles, needs/wants, and stage in the buyer’s journey, which means not only personalizing email greetings but delivering specialized content to each category of user. If customers are reading, comprehending, and interacting with the meaningful content created and sent to them, they will have an elevated experience and greater knowledge retention. That translates into increased usage and sales.
Some 78% of the most successful marketers are creating more content than they did a year ago, so delivering a more relevant and personalized piece of content is becoming more necessary (and effective).
4. Reuse and repurpose content
Forbes recently reported that 69% of CEOs believe that their marketing organizations waste money on redundant marketing initiatives. Apparently, marketers agree.
Successful marketers know that by maximizing their investments through repurposing their deliverables, they can help alleviate this concern. In a 2014 survey, conducted by MarketingProfs and the Content Marketing Institute, 86% of CMOs said they were also looking for ways to repurpose content across new platforms within the next 12months, without recreating or reformatting it in any way.
Rather than creating individual marketing deliverables for each event or product launch, and instead of spending money on content specific to a channel or device, focus on reusing and repurposing the same content marketing applications across any device or marketing channel.
Similar to responsive design, new marketing platforms (like the Kaon Application Delivery Network) are finally allowing for interactive content to be created once and deployed everywhere (mobile devices, tablets, desktops, websites, touch screens, etc.). This gives companies the ability to create one cost-effective “user-driven” piece of content that can address multiple constituents within the buying ecosystem, across multiple selling environments (sales meetings, websites, trade shows, briefing centers, training, etc.). Same brand, same message, same value story.
5. Face-to-Face Interactions: The Most Effective Venues

“Though digital marketing is the most common platform for interactive applications, delivering content in an interactive manner can, and does, happen face to face as well.”

“Moreover, just because some piece of content is online does not make it interactive.”

“Being interactive means that there is a dialog, a back and forth between the user and the application, that delivers a personalized, more effective experience. (Think of the difference between watching a video and playing a video game.)”

  

How To Create Engaging Contents For Your Social Media

Prince Mohamed Khan

The first rule of social media marketing is that you don’t push advertisements and contents that people wouldn’t enjoy or entertain.

It is a social network and your contents should be created according to that. The contents should be balanced between marketing and generic. It should keep your target audience engaged and create a meaningful relationship with them.

If you create only marketing content (about yourself and your product) alone and pay a large sum of money for advertising them, it would still be spamming and not marketing.

Some tips for creating social media marketing contents

1. Make it visual

An image speaks more than thousand words.

2. Posting in after hours and weekends

In the working hours people mostly will be occupied  with their works. Generally people will be occupied with their office works during this hours. So, the probability of sewing the posts during this time frame will…

View original post 194 more words

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Twitter is in Trouble of Becoming the Bing of Social Media

Twitter in danger

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“What is Twitter? To people who use it all the time, the question is almost laughable, like asking “What is talking?” But to people who don’t use it, the question is hard to answer. It’s also hard, apparently, if you’re Twitter.”

“The social media company will announce its quarterly earnings later today. More than any dollar amount, shareholders will watch closely for signs of life among Twitter’s users—more sign-ups, more visits, more tweets. When Twitter last reported its financial results in October, growth in user numbers and activity had been sluggish, leading to a big drop in Twitter’s share price and much badmouthing of Twitter CEO Dick Costolo. Since then, Twitter has rolled out several new features aimed at making the service more inviting and user-friendly. But what if the very features that make the service more approachable for n00bs alienates the core audience that finds it so addictive?”

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“A lot of people like Twitter, love Twitter, obsess over Twitter. But a lot of people just don’t get it, and Twitter has never quite communicated a clear enough reason for them to try. The new instant timeline offers a tentative step in that direction. But by now, has the crowd or early-ish adopters simply moved on? Are there really that many people left capable of being swayed by a turn-key Twitter feed? If anyone was at all interested in Twitter, wouldn’t they have tried it by now?”

“Compared to Facebook, the concept of Twitter is fuzzy, as is the product itself. Facebook started out as a place to connect with friends on the web. That’s still pretty much what it is, although the experience for many users has been ported to mobile devices. Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey, by comparison, conceived of his creation as a text message-based way of keeping up with friends’ whereabouts (hence the 140-character limit). Over time, Twitter migrated to the web and then smartphones as its endlessly creative users led the way in pushing what a tweet could do and be. Twitter proudly boasts that its users invented many of the conventions now taken for granted today, including the “@” reply, the hashtag, and the retweet. That’s great for that original diehards. What about for everyone else?”

“At first, Twitter’s flexibility drove its rapid rise to popularity. It started as a simple idea, but users discovered how to make it so much more. As such, Twitter ensured its status as a platform, a tool on which to build new experiences. And like other online communities that grow from the ground up, users codified conventions and practices that set apart their unique culture. That’s wonderful when building a new medium is your priority. But an insider culture risks intimidating everyone on the outside. Which is a problem when you’re trying to build a business.”

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“Enormous Startup Friction Remains”
“Twitter is now a media company in an industry where financial success is a function of scaling attention. And attention on a billion-user scale—on the scale of Facebook—comes through breadth of appeal. But Twitter is not as user-friendly as Facebook, nor as clear on what purpose it serves. Figuring out what RT, @, and DM mean isn’t all that hard. Neither is finding interesting people to follow, or joining the kinds of public conversations that make Twitter unique and thrilling. But even with that low a bar, people need a reason to bother trying to get over it in the first place. And Twitter hasn’t succeeded at defining clearly what that reason is.”

“Auto-filled timelines in theory put great content in front of users from the start. But a timeline of things everyone finds interesting sounds a lot like Facebook. Meanwhile, Twitter is offering a slew of other features geared toward making the service better for those who already use it, such as native video, messaging (via group DMs), and in-app analytics. All of these are geared toward one of the company’s basic business challenges—getting people who sign up for Twitter to keep using it. And Twitter has a lot to prove on that front after reporting a far lower rate of daily active users last quarter —than Face.”

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“What is Twitter? To people who use it all the time, the question is almost laughable, like asking “What is talking?” But to people who don’t use it, the question is hard to answer. It’s also hard, apparently, if you’re Twitter.”

“The social media company will announce its quarterly earnings later today. More than any dollar amount, shareholders will watch closely for signs of life among Twitter’s users—more sign-ups, more visits, more tweets. When Twitter last reported its financial results in October, growth in user numbers and activity had been sluggish, leading to a big drop in Twitter’s share price and much badmouthing of Twitter CEO Dick Costolo. Since then, Twitter has rolled out several new features aimed at making the service more inviting and user-friendly. But what if the very features that make the service more approachable for n00bs alienates the core audience that finds it so addictive?”

“A lot of people like Twitter, love Twitter, obsess over Twitter. But a lot of people just don’t get it, and Twitter has never quite communicated a clear enough reason for them to try. The new instant timeline offers a tentative step in that direction. But by now, has the crowd or early-ish adopters simply moved on? Are there really that many people left capable of being swayed by a turn-key Twitter feed? If anyone was at all interested in Twitter, wouldn’t they have tried it by now?”

“Compared to Facebook, the concept of Twitter is fuzzy, as is the product itself. Facebook started out as a place to connect with friends on the web. That’s still pretty much what it is, although the experience for many users has been ported to mobile devices. Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey, by comparison, conceived of his creation as a text message-based way of keeping up with friends’ whereabouts (hence the 140-character limit). Over time, Twitter migrated to the web and then smartphones as its endlessly creative users led the way in pushing what a tweet could do and be. Twitter proudly boasts that its users invented many of the conventions now taken for granted today, including the “@” reply, the hashtag, and the retweet. That’s great for that original diehards. What about for everyone else?”

“At first, Twitter’s flexibility drove its rapid rise to popularity. It started as a simple idea, but users discovered how to make it so much more. As such, Twitter ensured its status as a platform, a tool on which to build new experiences. And like other online communities that grow from the ground up, users codified conventions and practices that set apart their unique culture. That’s wonderful when building a new medium is your priority. But an insider culture risks intimidating everyone on the outside. Which is a problem when you’re trying to build a business.”

“Enormous Startup Friction Remains
Twitter is now a media company in an industry where financial success is a function of scaling attention. And attention on a billion-user scale—on the scale of Facebook—comes through breadth of appeal. But Twitter is not as user-friendly as Facebook, nor as clear on what purpose it serves. Figuring out what RT, @, and DM mean isn’t all that hard. Neither is finding interesting people to follow, or joining the kinds of public conversations that make Twitter unique and thrilling. But even with that low a bar, people need a reason to bother trying to get over it in the first place. And Twitter hasn’t succeeded at defining clearly what that reason is.”

“Auto-filled timelines in theory put great content in front of users from the start. But a timeline of things everyone finds interesting sounds a lot like Facebook. Meanwhile, Twitter is offering a slew of other features geared toward making the service better for those who already use it, such as native video, messaging (via group DMs), and in-app analytics. All of these are geared toward one of the company’s basic business challenges—getting people who sign up for Twitter to keep using it. And Twitter has a lot to prove on that front after reporting a far lower rate of daily active users last quarter —than Facebook.”

“Twitter is vaguely cooler than Facebook, and vaguely geekier. (Imagine the Venn diagram of people who like crossword puzzles and people who like compressing their thoughts into 140 characters.) All of Facebook’s geekiness, on the other hand, is under the hood, hidden behind a bland exterior that foregrounds “friending.” Facebook owes its success to a combination of its more approachable surface and its craftier manipulations beneath that surface. Facebook doesn’t hide the fact that it massages users’ News Feeds to optimize for what both users and advertisers want.”

“On Twitter, by contrast, your feed is your feed—every tweet from everyone you follow. Twitter has flirted with inserting itself into users’ timelines in a more Facebook-like way, including tweets from accounts that you don’t follow. Even the possibility of such machinations has elicited howls from Twitter’s power users, the base that feels the strongest sense of ownership over the platform. This reaction illustrates the crux of Twitter’s dilemma: it can cater to its power users and become a company that sells to a small but committed niche. Or it can alienate those users in an effort to become more like Facebook, to which it will always be compared, especially by investors.”

“This leaves Twitter kind of stuck. Staying niche means Twitter will never grow to match the money engines spinning away at Facebook and Google. But trying to be more like Facebook seems like an effort that will fail before it ever begins. If Facebook is to social as Google is to search, that would make Twitter Bing.”

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News Flash: You Can’t Fake Being Authentic

You Can’t Fake Being Authentic

“A lot is being said and written about being authentic these days because so many people aren’t. Think about a police chief who fudges his department’s response to a crisis. Or, government and corporate leaders that promise one thing and then do another.”

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“What is Authenticity?:

Authenticity means being real or genuine, and telling the truth. You can’t tell someone you’re being authentic. You have to demonstrate it by your behavior. You have to be who you say you are.

Employees value a CEO who is honest and not afraid to open himself up and show some emotion. We coached a senior partner of a law firm for several years. One day he was asked to speak to the partnership about what the firm meant to him.

When talking about the firm in rehearsal, he was overcome with emotion and had difficulty getting the words out. He kept practicing because we knew that once he was able to manage his emotions, he could hold his own on stage.

On the day of the meeting, Jim got through his remarks with a catch or two in his voice and just a few tears in his eyes. His ability to show emotion may have surprised some of the partners, but they were very touched by his authenticity and his love of the firm.”

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“Mingling With Employees:

When your name is on the door, you can never be just “one of the guys.” It’s a delicate balance between being aloof and developing a genuine rapport with employees.

Bill Hewlett and David Packard, the founders of Hewlett Packard, practiced management by walking around , a concept popularized in the blockbuster book In Search of Excellence . This means making spontaneous visits to employees to learn first hand what’s really going in the company and getting valuable feedback from employees. These visits are a great morale booster.

But you can’t just drop into the company cafeteria once a year and pretend that you’re interested in your employees. That’s just going through the motions. It’s not authentic.”

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“Good leaders meet with their employees regularly. One CEO we work with invites a different group of employees to dine with him in the cafeteria every other week. He learns more than he would by sitting in his office and it demonstrates his genuine commitment.

The founder and now retired CEO of Costco, Jim Sinegal, was labeled a “retailing genius” in a CNBC special about the retailer (below). A shirtsleeves leader, he spent most of his time on the road visiting his warehouse stores. He wanted to know from store managers what was working and what wasn’t. Sinegal could then apply what he learned to the entire network.”

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8 Frightening Ways Social Media Is Molding Us

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Thought Catalog

ShutterstockShutterstock

For the longest time, I questioned the sanity of people who were perpetually drawn to staring at their pelvis. I used to raise an eyebrow at this madness, but then a light bulb flicked on one day: Oh, it’s that snazzy little gadget they’re drawn to! It’s everywhere. Church, parties, classes, get togethers. Once I even saw a couple out on a date who were staring more romantically at their iPhones than each other. Perhaps they were just Facebook chatting in hopes to get to know each other. My bad.

Whatever the case is, it seems that these devices are causing a lot more damage than simply brainwashing and making us speak their alienating language.

Actually, while I enlighten you, I’m going to take a picture of my #smoothie and the #sunrise and then squeeze my microscopic boobs together to get a sexy Instie shot. Eh, what the heck…

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Why You Should Share The Positive, Not The Negative (Especially On Social Media)

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Thought Catalog

Not too long ago I was asked why I don’t write about sad things anymore. My answer is this:

I don’t think there’s a magical equation in life that ensures you eternal happiness. And I don’t necessarily think happiness is merely internal. I, do, however think there are steps you can actively take to fill your heart just a little bit further each and every night. One of those things, I believe, is being careful with what you choose to share with the world.

Social media is full of gruesome videos, inappropriate photos, hateful comments, and sorely biased articles. It’s full of racism, bullying, and negativity. And frankly, folks, I’m sick of it.

Have we all been guilty of complaining on social media? Of talking about how tired we are, how much we hate our jobs, how much we miss someone who hurt us? Well, of course. I’ll be the…

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